NZers prepared to move offshore for right job

By Susie Nordqvist

File photo
File photo

Many New Zealanders would be willing to move for the right job, even if meant relocating offshore, a new survey suggests.

The findings are contained Kelly Global Workforce Index, which surveyed almost 2000 New Zealanders.

A total of 79 per cent of respondents said they were prepared to move for the right job and 40 per cent said they were prepared to move within New Zealand.

More than a one-third (38 per cent) said they would be willing to relocate to another country or continent, with the most likely candidates being those working in the IT sector.

Perhaps not surprisingly the most mobile workers were those aged 18 - 29, with almost half saying they would travel offshore for a new job.

More than a third of workers aged 30-49 and 31 per cent of respondents aged 50 - 65 said they would move overseas for the right job.

Kelly Services managing director Debbie Grenfell said an environment where the market for talent was becoming global, more and more people were assessing job opportunities offshore to advance their career.

"Many skills that were once specific to a region or country are now able to be carried out in varied parts of the globe, meaning that job mobility becomes important for career advancement. In fast-growing sectors such as engineering, science, finance and healthcare, there is diverse global demand that can present personal rewards and career opportunities for those willing to travel," Grenfell said.

Europe was flagged as the most appealing destination for globetrotting New Zealand job seekers (39 per cent) well ahead of Asia Pacific (18 per cent), North America (14 per cent) South America and the Middle East (3 per cent) and Africa, 1 per cent.

Meanwhile respondents said the desire to move to a different continent was driven by "the experience" rather than setting up permanent residence, with 48 per cent prepared to stay for three years or less.

The survey, conducted from October 2010 through January 2011, also revealed that a significant number of people were working in "unconventional arrangements," involving long or unusual hours, multiple jobs, living away from home or excessive travel.

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