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Hope for campervan renal service in Bay

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A Tauranga man born with a degenerative kidney condition says life would not be the same without nocturnal dialysis but things would be even better if he had a campervan kitted out with renal service.

Scott Smith suffers from Alport's Syndrome and praises the Midland Regional Renal Service for improving his quality of life.

Mr Smith's older brother and two uncles have already died from the hereditary condition.

"I knew from an early age it would happen; it was just a matter of when," said the married father-of-one from Greerton.

"I was 25 and on my OE in England when it did."

Mr Smith, who has had two kidney replacements in the last 15 years, now has to spend 11 hours every other day connected to a home haemodialysis machine - which performs the kidney function of cleaning toxins and removing fluid from his blood.

"For the last 18 months I have been going through the transition from peritoneal dialysis to home haemodialysis (HHD).

The biggest change though has been the establishment of the nocturnal service which means my dialysis can take place overnight. New initiatives like that have been really helpful," said the naturopath.

"Nocturnal dialysis has definitely given me more freedom and a better quality of life."

Mr Smith is now part of a steering group which seeks to give even greater freedom to HHD patients.

The Freedom Dialysis Project has been launched to purchase and kit out a campervan with dialysis equipment. It is designed to allow patients the freedom to travel and spend more time away from the confines of home.

"At the moment patients can't go more than a day away from their machines," said Mr Smith.

"The machines are not transportable so it means you're really restricted.

"A year ago we had a family holiday down in Christchurch and the DHB down there has a campervan set up for HHD patients. We used it for two weeks travelling around the South Island. It was fantastic; it just gives you such a sense of freedom and independence."

It is estimated the campervan would cost $100,000-150,000 to purchase and modify.

"We don't have anything like this in the top half of the North Island and it's something which is really needed," said Mr Smith.

"Auckland doesn't have anything like this so I'm anticipating there will be a significant demand.

"You just need to be able to get to somewhere to connect with power and water every other night. It's not just for holidays but will also allow people to visit friends and family for longer than a night.

"It's a great project and will make a huge difference to HHD patients."

The steering group will meet to discuss sponsorship for the project. The target is to have sufficient funds to commission the van by early 2015.

- BAY OF PLENTY TIMES

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