Ruth is the human interest reporter and a photographer for the Bay of Plenty Times.

Pokemon craze benefits local shops

Add a comment

Tauranga businesses tapping into the Pokemon Go craze say the games is providing a welcome boost in foot traffic but a marketing stunt has outraged some fans.

A number of businesses and attractions across the Western Bay of Plenty including Baycourt, Memorial Park, Katikati Bird Gardens, and shops and restaurants in Tauranga have been advertising themselves Pokestops.

Others have set up recharging stations for cellphones because mobile battery life was quickly reduced with the smart phone app.

Tauranga Robert Harris franchise owner Guy Irwin said his staff had been noticing more people outside their restaurant searching for Pokemon.

Mr Irwin said since the holidays had started the cafe had been busier and questioned whether people catching Pokemon had contributed to it.

Cornerstone owner and operator Taut Tocker said the pub had become a Pokestop.

"Since the game launched we have definitely noticed groups of people in, on their phones playing Pokemon Go.

"It has been great for getting patrons in who maybe would not normally come in."

Being a Pokestop was something of a novelty, he said.

"It is fun to be a part of."

Katikati Bird Gardens owner Scott Robertson said his business had become a rural Pokestop.

"People can get more balls and lures, which is the main attraction because Pokemon are everywhere," he said.

"If you do visit the cafe and the garden you have the opportunity to stock up on all the bits and pieces you need for catching Pokemon."

Ben, 14, Rory, 11, and Phoebe Robertson, 14, searching for Pokemon in Katikati Bird Gardens. Photo/Andrew Warner
Ben, 14, Rory, 11, and Phoebe Robertson, 14, searching for Pokemon in Katikati Bird Gardens. Photo/Andrew Warner

Mr Robertson knew of cafes around which were actually buying lures to attract more people into their shops, he said.

"That attracts a lot of people because the lures attract Pokemon."

Other businesses contacted by the Bay of Plenty Times said the app had resulted in foot traffic but no increased trade.

While many shops and restaurants were supporting the Pokemon Go app, Krazy Jacks sparked outrage by telling Pokemon fans they would be "told directly to f*** off".

"The drinking age is set to 18 plus because apparently at this age you are responsible enough. Playing Pokemon at this age tells us you're still immature."

But Krazy Jacks' management have been quick to respond to the criticism, saying it was a marketing stunt that's worked well.

"Now that I have successfully gained so many people's attention," they said. "As for what you're into we don't care this was just a brilliant marketing scheme to get everyone's attention."

- Bay of Plenty Times

On the GO

The Pokemon GO app is an augmented reality game, which combines an image of a Pokemon, with the user’s real world view. It gives players the change to catch Pokemon in various locations by showing their location on a map, with PokeStops, local landmarks where users collect items, and Pokemon Gyms, where players can battle Pokemon.

Get the news delivered straight to your inbox

Receive the day’s news, sport and entertainment in our daily email newsletter

SIGN UP NOW

Have your say

1200 characters left

By and large our readers' comments are respectful and courteous. We're sure you'll fit in well.
View commenting guidelines.

© Copyright 2016, NZME. Publishing Limited

Assembled by: (static) on production apcf04 at 11 Dec 2016 20:32:29 Processing Time: 970ms