The employee who sent out a false missile alert in Hawaii earlier this month has been fired and the emergency management administrator of the state has resigned.

This follows the official report into the debacle which revealed the unidentified staff member genuinely thought Hawaii was under attack and issued it in panic.

The employee has still not been named since they sent out the phone alert at 8.07am on January 13, sparking mass panic across the state.

In addition, Emergency Management Administrator Vern Miyagi, who appeared alongside Hawaii Governor David Ige as they tried to calm the panicked state that day has resigned from his position.

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It went uncorrected for 38 minutes until a second alert was sent out to confirm it was a false alarm.

The alert went uncorrected for 38 minutes until a second alert was sent out to confirm it was a false alarm.
The alert went uncorrected for 38 minutes until a second alert was sent out to confirm it was a false alarm.

The mistake has been under investigation by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission ever since and mystery has surrounded what exactly went wrong.

On Tuesday, the Commission revealed that the employee was taking part in a Hawaii Emergency Management Agency drill and that it was the wording of that drill confused them.

When they heard the words 'this is not a drill' played on a speakerphone, they believed them and afterwards, they did not hear the 'exercise, exercise, exercise' that followed.

Because of that, the employee pressed the button and believed they had done the right thing until the alert appeared on colleagues' phones.

They scrambled to tell television and radio stations that the alarm was false and they corrected it on Twitter within 12 minutes but the second phone alert took 38 minutes.

It took so long for a correction to be issued because they did not have that procedure in place.

The employee who has now lost his job made the claim in a written statement but has not been interviewed by the FCC.

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Initially, Hawaii's Governor said the employee 'pressed the wrong button by accident' during a shift change.

On the day the alert was sent out, other staff said the employee responsible 'felt really bad'.

'This guy feels bad, right. He's not doing this on purpose - it was a mistake on his part and he feels terrible about it,' said EMA Administrator Vern Miyagi.

Governor David Ige apologised for the confusion at the time.

'I am sorry for the pain and confusion it caused. I, too, am extremely upset about this and am doing everything I can do to immediately improve our emergency management systems, procedures and staffing,' he said.