One of Radio Hauraki's original pirates, Ian Magan, has died.

The respected broadcaster and music promoter has been a feature of the New Zealand music industry since he helped launch the country's first private radio station, Radio Hauraki.

In a statement on social media, the network paid tribute to the former host.

"Radio Hauraki is deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Ian Magan. A true legend of New Zealand broadcasting and one of the original pirates. We would not be here today if it wasn't for his vision and bravery. Our thoughts are with his family and friends. Rest In Peace."

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Broadcaster Ian Magan has died.
Broadcaster Ian Magan has died.

Magan was one of the original hosts on Radio Hauraki - alongside David Gapes, Derek Lowe and Chris Parkinson - when the pirate radio station began broadcasting on a boat in the Hauraki Gulf in 1966.

At the time, all radio was controlled by the Government and was limited to Top 20 hit parades. But young Kiwis wanted to hear more music and the pirates came together to give the people what they wanted.

In 2014, Magan told the New Zealand Herald that when Radio Hauraki first took to the high seas, "most of us were optimists and thought we'd clean it up in six-to-eight months. Instead we spent three-and-a-half years having no idea of what the next day would bring."

Ian Magan with his daughter Tracey and granddaughter Jilly.
Ian Magan with his daughter Tracey and granddaughter Jilly.

Radio Hauraki operated at sea, outside the three-mile limit, before a change in Government gave them the opportunity to apply for a legitimate licence in 1969.

In 2010, Magan told the New Zealand Herald how the group would hold clandestine meetings with a gin-swigging Robert Muldoon in downstairs Auckland restaurants.

After leaving Radio Hauraki, Magan stayed in the music industry, founding Pacific Entertainment, which brought some of the world's biggest headline acts to New Zealand, including Michael Jackson, AC/DC and Elton John and Billy Joel.