A team of eight police officers stood outside the Davis Theatre in Whanganui as people gathered to watch a live broadcast of a National Remembrance Service in Christchurch.

About 30 people turned out to the screening on Friday morning which was introduced by Whanganui district councillor Josh Chandulal-Mackay.

"It has been two weeks since people in Christchurch had their lives taken in heinous circumstances," he said.

The broadcast is being shared around the country as a joint initiative between the Department of Internal Affairs and Local Government New Zealand.

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Chandulal-Mackay said the Race Unity Day held in Majestic Square in Majestic Square the day after the shootings provided a worthwhile antidote to the killings.

"It had been scheduled before the mass shootings in Christchurch and along with the Awa Karakia held at Putiki, the Unity March and the Queenspark vigil last Friday, they have helped to unite our community."

Gavin Brooks led a karakia on behalf of Whanganui iwi which was followed by the singing of waiata Te Aroha.

Islamic Association of Whanganui president Mukarram Mairaj speaks at the live broadcast of the National Remembrance Service in Christchurch. Photo/ Bevan Conley
Islamic Association of Whanganui president Mukarram Mairaj speaks at the live broadcast of the National Remembrance Service in Christchurch. Photo/ Bevan Conley

Islamic Association of Whanganui president Mukarram Mairaj expressed his appreciation to the Whanganui community and New Zealanders at large for their support during the past two weeks.

"In the last two weeks, I have had the opportunity to speak in many places and what you have done for the Muslim community is greatly appreciated.

"In history, we cannot find examples of this kind of support."

Mairaj said he wanted to share a few basic facts about the Islamic faith.

Whanganui district councillor Josh Chandulal-Mackay addresses the gathering at the National Remembrance Service screening at the Davis Theatre. Photo/ Bevan Conley
Whanganui district councillor Josh Chandulal-Mackay addresses the gathering at the National Remembrance Service screening at the Davis Theatre. Photo/ Bevan Conley

"It is a religion of peace - not a militant religion.

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"It encourages people to stand with the helpless and that is what you have done."

He concluded by saying that people can stand in any place of worship but inside your heart is where you will find God.