International media are raving that Rotorua iwi have "stolen the show" with their "spectacular" powhiri for the royal couple.

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, were welcomed onto Te Papaiouru Marae this morning in Ohinemutu by Te Arawa iwi Ngāti Whakaue

Sky News cameraman Adam Cole said the welcome gave him goosebumps.

"This is spectacular ... It's a hell of a way to end the tour. That ceremony was so powerful."

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The Royal Party are welcomed onto Te Papaiouru Marae during thier visit to Rotorua today. Photo / Alan Gibson
The Royal Party are welcomed onto Te Papaiouru Marae during thier visit to Rotorua today. Photo / Alan Gibson

Cole said the royal couple were also welcomed at Government House with a powhiri.

"This trumped it. The whole press pen said the same thing. And, yes, I did think it stole the show, what a great last day."

Daily Mirror royal correspondent Russell Myers said the powhiri ceremony was "incredible to witness".

ITV News correspondent Rupert Evelyn said it was a "powerful welcome".

"Wow. In a homogenised world such a powerful welcome for Harry and Meghan stands out."

Te Arawa had also made he and fellow media feel very "welcome", he said.

"The Te Arawa people in Rotorua welcome us media with amazing food and say they are 'privileged' to have us here. I feel privileged to be here."

Earlier, when the Duke of Sussex gave his speech, there were cheers when he opened his address to Ngāti Whakaue in te reo.

His clear and strong pronunciation in his greeting drew even more applause.

He thanked the weavers of his korowai and finished the speech in te reo again, saying: "Mauri ora kia koutou katoa."

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Harry said he was pleased to be spending time here at the edge of the lake and with the people of Te Arawa.

"Thank you so much for the beautiful cloak you have gifted myself and the duchess."

The Royal Party are welcomed onto Te Papaiouru Marae during thier visit to Rotorua today. Photo / Alan Gibson
The Royal Party are welcomed onto Te Papaiouru Marae during thier visit to Rotorua today. Photo / Alan Gibson

He said the great skill and aroha which went into making it would see it as a treasured taonga in their family.

He then led the waiata himself, singing all of the words to Te Aroha in te reo.

It comes after Markle spoke te reo in her speech on women's suffrage at Government House on Sunday night, including "tēnā koutou katoa" in her introduction.

Sir Toby Curtis, spokesman for Te Arawa, said prior to the visit that it would allow the tribe to extend its manaakitanga (respect/generosity/care) to the royal couple, and with the resulting global interest, allow the world to experience the unique hospitality and warmth of the tribe.