This year marks the 50th anniversary of the 1968 Uprisings.

Starting in May, it was a summer rebellion of rowdy students and workers' unions that brought France to its knees. A period which brought anarchy in the streets of the capital and paralysed the French transport network.

It was an era which travellers may be able to sympathise with today. This summer has brought scenes of chaos, with Air France and TGV picketing the runways and station platforms of Paris.

Rarely a summer goes by without tourists being stranded by industrial action somewhere in France.

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Since '68, civil unrest and "le strike" have become national pastimes. This year French unions released an extensive calendar of strikes from April through July, by way of commemoration.

Meanwhile, on the streets of Paris, the artist Banksy has marked the Uprisings' anniversary in his own way.

The enigmatic graffiti artist has sprayed his politically charged images from the walls of New York to Gaza City.

But this May a series of nine images have appeared across Paris. On varying themes, and in some unusual places. Each location picked for maximum impact.

. Fire door, Bataclan

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. Sorbonne University

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The images were authenticated by Banksy, who shared them on social media and set his fans hunting.

In Bijou Montmartre, one of his stencilled rats rides a champagne cork up a set of stairs.

On the Université de Paris Sorbonne, a macabre image has appeared of a doctor giving a dog a bone.

In Porte de la Chapelle, outside a migrant's soup kitchen, a girl has been painted covering over a swastika.

Porte de la Chapelle: There has been some 'resistance' to the British artist's new works. Photo / Getty
Porte de la Chapelle: There has been some 'resistance' to the British artist's new works. Photo / Getty

Then, on one of the fire escapes at the Bataclan concert hall, site of the November massacre, floats the spectral image of a woman wearing a hijab.

The artist's previous paintings have been bought at auction for over $200,000.
You'd have thought the Parisians would have been pleased.

However, in typical Gallic fashion, the city has put up a resistance.

Of the nine Banksy murals which appeared in Paris this May, at least three have been covered in protective Plexiglas while another two have been defaced.

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Paris is a capital of arts and has long been seen as an arbiter of taste, but these paintings' reception is decidedly mixed.

Maybe the city isn't as easily charmed by Banksy's ascorbic style as collectors are in New York or London.

Though perhaps – in the case of the depictions on the Porte de la Chapelle and the Sorbonne – these paintings were a little too close to the bone.

Many of Banksy's pictures have been covered with protective Plexiglass to avoid further damage. Photo / Getty
Many of Banksy's pictures have been covered with protective Plexiglass to avoid further damage. Photo / Getty

Paris of course has its own fair share of street artists.

With paintings springing up around the world, it seems you can see Banksy's work anywhere. Instead, why not try one of these tours and check out some original work by locals stars of the "Paris Scene":

Street Art Tour Paris runs public tours of Montmartre, Belleville and the city's super-size murals. The group also runs sorties out to Vitry-sur-Seine, a satellite town whose urban art gives the capital a run for its money. From 22€/pp
streetarttourparis.com
The Free Original Paris Alternative Tour offers plenty of cost-effective fun. Taking in more street daubings, bars and local history than you can shake an aerosol at. Free, though tip expected
free-paris-tours.com/tours/free-original-paris-alternative-tour/
Street Art Paris runs walking tours every weekend to the city's art neighbourhoods, Oberkampf, Belleville and Ménilmontant. Saturday and Sundays at 11am, €20pp
streetartparis.fr/street-art-tours-paris