New Zealand Public Party leader Billy Te Kahika is expecting more protests to follow after people took to the streets in Whangārei yesterday.

But a researcher is urging people to make sure they got accurate information from legitimate sources and people they trust.

About 60 people gathered at the Whangārei police station after people from two groups - FACTS NZ and Kotahitanga Movement Aotearoa - held separate marches from Forum North to the police station where they held a kōrero referencing how the Government's alert level system, among other things, violated their rights.

Protesters walk down Walton St yesterday. Photo / Tania Whyte
Protesters walk down Walton St yesterday. Photo / Tania Whyte

Members of both groups then combined to walk along Walton and Dent Sts, stopping cars at traffic lights and roundabouts as they walked along the road.

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Initially, two police officers monitored the first march at Forum North. As the groups spilled on to the road, more than a dozen officers were patrolling alongside the protest.

Te Kahika, who said he had not organised the protest, said its purpose was to air the concerns regarding the Government's response to Covid-19.

"The concerns that these people have today are the same concerns that I have and that is that I'm concerned that the Covid-19 management style of the Government is overreaching," he said.

The group strongly opposed an alert level four lockdown. Photo / Tania Whyte
The group strongly opposed an alert level four lockdown. Photo / Tania Whyte

Te Kahika said he knew of other "massive" protests being planned currently and supported the people's right to have their voices heard in a non-violent manner.

"I think a peaceful protest that interrupts traffic, if done in a safe way, I think that's reasonable.

"History has taught us that the most effective form of protest is non-violent."

Workshop co-director Dr Jessica Berentson-Shaw is a researcher who studies public narratives and how people find accurate information.

Dr Jessica Berentson-Shaw from The Workshop in Wellington. Photo / Supplied
Dr Jessica Berentson-Shaw from The Workshop in Wellington. Photo / Supplied

She explained how it was important for people to seek out information regarding Covid-19 from trusted members of their community.

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"The Prime Minister will talk about listening to doctors but for lots of people, doctors aren't necessarily trusted people," she said.

"Are there health professionals for Māori who they trust, who they can talk to about this information, are there community leaders they can talk to if they are concerned about this information?

"If this stuff is raising concerns for them, which for lots of people it will, thinking about who are the trusted members of the community is really good."

Berentson-Shaw said it was dangerous to accept information at face value, something which was encouraged by social media.

Instead of attempting to debunk misinformation, Berentson-Shaw advised people against spreading such information and rather focus on promoting reliable sources.

Northland Police district commander Tony Hill said police recognised the right to lawfully protest but encouraged people to abide by alert level restrictions.

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"We strongly urge anyone taking part to adhere to all current restrictions in place," he said.

"The Northland area is currently at alert level 2 and we are asking the public again to do their part and follow all guidance currently in place."