Day one of the cricket World Cup is in the books with England making a strong statement in a 104-run win over South Africa.

Heres everything you need to know from overnight.

England comfortably handle South Africa

England comfortably handled South Africa and a lively Oval pitch to take the opening match of the Cricket World Cup by 104 runs with 10 overs to spare.

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It was the statement win sought by the hot title favorites, but not as expected.

The bowlers starred rather than the batsmen, notably newcomer Jofra Archer, who took three wickets and generated pace that scared the South Africa top order.

Because England has been putting up huge totals, 311-8 on a green-tinged pitch seemed only decent, though the home side was content. They were certain they could defend it, despite chasing sides having an excellent record at the Oval.

Their cause was helped by South Africa blowing the script, again. The pressure was too much to bear on a batting lineup not as deep as England's and South Africa was all out for 207 in the 40th over.

England's Ben Stokes celebrates after taking the wicket of South Africa's Kagiso Rabada during their Cricket World Cup match at the Oval in London. Photo / AP
England's Ben Stokes celebrates after taking the wicket of South Africa's Kagiso Rabada during their Cricket World Cup match at the Oval in London. Photo / AP

'Best catch I've ever seen'

Ben Stokes capped an inspirational all-round performance with a one-handed catch that will go down among the greatest in tournament history.

Stokes top-scored with 89 and finished the match with two wickets in as many balls but his best moment came while he was stationed at deep midwicket - a quite astonishing leaping effort with his outstretched right hand seeing off Andile Phehlukwayo.

What he said

"[Tell us about the bloody catch, Ben] I had a little bit of a panic on, to be honest – I was a little bit further in than I should have been. I've got the nickname 'Claw', and luckily it stuck! I didn't really know I'd react because I shouldn't have been there, and if I'd been in the right position it would have been a regulation catch.

"The messages from the batsmen in the middle were that it was a tricky wicket and that we should try to get 300-310. Towards the end the South African bowlers were really hard to get away, but I think psychologically getting over 300 was a big thing. And we obviously knew what was best for our bowlers to do because we'd seen what South Africa did.

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"The atmosphere was unbelievable; it was really loud. It was a fantastic turnout for the first World Cup game, so thanks to everybody. We hope it continues."

England's Ben Stokes, second left, celebrates with teammates after running out South Africa's Dwaine Pretorius during their Cricket World Cup match at the Oval in London. Photo / AP
England's Ben Stokes, second left, celebrates with teammates after running out South Africa's Dwaine Pretorius during their Cricket World Cup match at the Oval in London. Photo / AP

Faf du Plessis speaks

"We were outplayed in all three departments. They had some really good partnerships with the bat. We brought it back well at the end, but then Jofra got two wickets up front – three, really, with Hash retiring hurt – and we were behind the eight-ball.

"Losing Hash affected the flow of the innings. He's okay now. When he came off the field he was a bit all over the place and we were a bit worried about him, but they did the test and it looked like he did everything right.

"I thought 300 was a par score; the wicket was a bit slower than it normally plays. We wanted to target the openers with spin, especially Jason Roy, which is why we opened with Imran Tahir. I thought our bowling was really good. But England batted really well."

Whats new with Black Caps?

There's less than 48 hours until their opening game of the Cricket World Cup, and the Black Caps are still uncertain as to who will be spearheading their starting XI.

Black Caps coach Gary Stead wasn't ready to commit to naming his opening batsmen and opening bowling partnerships at training in Cardiff today, with injury niggles complicating an already tricky process before he names his side to play Sri Lanka on Saturday.

Two spots have been up for grabs all summer, with Henry Nicholls and Colin Munro vying to be Martin Guptill's partner to open the batting, while Matt Henry and Tim Southee have been battling to share the new ball with Trent Boult.

Despite having yet to truly fire in the opening role, Nicholls surely has the edge over Munro, whose selection would be a rather bold call, considering he has made just one 50 in his last 17 innings. The other Henry – Matt – looked to be the frontrunner to open the bowling after some strong displays against India and Bangladesh, but an absolute tonking – 2-107 from nine overs – by the West Indies, and a strong resurgence from Southee may have turned the tables.

Stead acknowledged that the warm-up matches had made those calls clearer, but said he was still unable to make a definitive decision

"We've got a few little niggles in the camp which we're monitoring at the moment and that may have a bearing on what we go with."

Those niggles include Munro, who has a bruised foot, though still managed to bat and bowl at training. It's hardly the walking wounded, with most players getting through a decent workload out in the middle at Sophia Gardens, but there was enough concern for Stead to err on the side of caution when discussing his options.

What games are on tonight?

West Indies take on Pakistan at 9.30pm NZT. The Black Caps are in action on Saturday night (NZT) opening their campaign against Sri Lanka at 9.30pm.