Colin Munro's test dream is over.

The New Zealand all-rounder has decided he wants to specialise in white-ball cricket, much like his friend and mentor Brendon McCullum.

That means he will be unavailable for the remainder of the Plunket Shield this season, or the England tests in the middle order if injury was to strike.

He will continue to play limited-overs cricket for New Zealand, form permitting. His last first-class match was for Auckland against Northern Districts in November.

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Unlike Mitchell McClenaghan, Munro will continue to keep his NZC contract.

The 30-year-old stressed his commitment to continue playing for New Zealand.

"It would be fair to say that my focus hasn't been on four-day cricket this season and my passion for that format of the game isn't what it once was," he said.

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Colin Munro will continue to play limited overs cricket for New Zealand. Photo / Getty
Colin Munro will continue to play limited overs cricket for New Zealand. Photo / Getty

"I'm still 100 per cent committed to playing for the Black Caps and Auckland Aces in the shorter formats and have some big goals I'd like to achieve in the next couple of years.

"Obviously with the World Cup next year I'd love to give myself the best chance of making that squad and that's where my main focus is."

His next foray after the one-day international series against England will be to head to the Indian Premier League where he was picked up by the Delhi Daredevils in January's auction for $406,000.

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His prodigious six-hitting has catapulted him into the national consciousness, particularly as the first batsman to hit three T20 international centuries.

A player once on the fringes has been thrust into the mainstream, at least in white-ball formats. Many would argue a first-class average of 51.58 at a strike rate of 99 from 48 matches, including 13 centuries, deserved to add to his one test cap against South Africa at Port Elizabeth in 2013.

Instead Munro will continue using his licence to unleash across 20 or 50 overs, a tactic which could pay dividends at the World Cup in 17 months.

A fulltime freelance future loomed, but he eventually signed a national contract last year.

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Colin Munro during the International Twenty20 Tri Series Final match between New Zealand and Australia. Photo / Getty
Colin Munro during the International Twenty20 Tri Series Final match between New Zealand and Australia. Photo / Getty

He regularly seeks the advice of former New Zealand captain McCullum. They starred together for the champion Trinbago Knight Riders in last year's Caribbean Premier League.

"Brendon's been the one cricketing constant I can fall back on, regardless of whether I'm going through a rough or a good patch. He keeps me grounded by having a laugh and a beer," Munro told the Weekend Herald in January.

"It just happens naturally. It's not like 'hey mate, I'm phoning you because I need some cricket knowledge'.

"His mantra is always to be aggressive and, if you're not sure of something, take the positive option."