Roger Federer isn't done yet.

The greatest of all time has proven there's plenty left in the tank - reaching a record seventh Australian Open final where he will compete for his 20th Grand Slam win.

Federer won the semi-final against Hyeon Chung after the Korean opponent retired from the match with a shocking blister on his foot.

While he still has to fight off Marin Cilic in the final at Melbourne Park tonight, Federer's legendary career highlights how durable he is and how cleverly he is scheduled.

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The world's media have never been shy to praise Federer, but it's hard not to given the extraordinary career the 36-year-old has had.

Jerry Bembry writing for ESPN pointed out that of the 1338 matches Federer has played since turning pro in 1998, he has never retired - he has finished every one.

Supporters of Roger Federer back the Swiss to win his 20th Grand Slam tonight. Photo / Getty Images
Supporters of Roger Federer back the Swiss to win his 20th Grand Slam tonight. Photo / Getty Images

"Just think about how amazing that is, playing a sport in which he is constantly lunging and sprinting.

"Playing through ankle tweaks and muscle aches and bad backs. Pushing his body through intense heat and tough opponents.

"Federer has not only survived, but he's thrived to maintain his status as one of the top players in tennis today," Bembry said.

How on earth do you beat Roger Federer? Writing for the Daily Telegraph, Charlie Eccleshare asked the formidable question.

Eccleshare expressed the thoughts of former Wimbledon finalist David Nalbandian to get his point across.

"Nalbandian, who beat Federer eight times in his career, said that most players' attitude before facing the Swiss was: 'Aw s***, I'm playing Roger, I'm out."

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"Nalbandian put his relative success against Federer down to the fact that: 'Every time I get on the court, I believe I can beat him. Not enough guys think that way," he wrote.

Eccleshare added that Nalbandian's assessment of Federer remains in the minds of current players.

"If anything, Federer's aura is stronger than ever now, and Nalbandian's assessment remains pertinent.

"Cilic will have a lot of scar tissue from the eight defeats he's suffered against Federer, but he must at least go into the final believing he can win," he said.

Roger Federer defeated Marin Cilic at the final of Wimbledon last year. Photo / Getty Images
Roger Federer defeated Marin Cilic at the final of Wimbledon last year. Photo / Getty Images

Writing with the New York Times, Christopher Clarey said that Federer was on top of Chung from the get-go of their semi.

"Federer and Chung, in their first meeting, played for only 62 minutes.

"That was more than long enough for Federer to identify and exploit Chung's weak points: his forehand under pressure, his first serve, his variety," he wrote.

Clarey also took the time to compare Federer to six-time champion Novak Djokovic who earlier lost to Chung.

"If he beats Cilic, Federer will have 20 major singles titles, increasing his record total among men to a nice round number that seemed all but unreachable when Djokovic was dominating the game in the first half of 2016.

"Djokovic has fallen back because of an elbow injury, but Federer glides on — thoroughly in his element."

Federer shakes hands with his opponent, Hyeon Chung as he retires injured. Photo / Getty Images
Federer shakes hands with his opponent, Hyeon Chung as he retires injured. Photo / Getty Images

Former British player John Lloyd speaking on the BBC was astounded by Federer's ability to remain so mobile as a veteran.

"It's unbelievable. I defy anyone to look at tapes when he was in his 20s and say he's not moving as well now.

"At 36 he's moving better than then! He's improved his game. He's added things to his game which is so remarkable," Lloyd said.

"Today he was just brilliant. His shot-making ability, taking the ball on the rise. There were actually a couple of points where Chung got him two feet behind the baseline.

"But other than that he was hugging the baseline. It was Agassi-like. Where he just stood in there and moved his opponent round side to side and took his legs away," he added.

Not everyone is writing off Cilic though. Writing for BBC Sport Russell Fuller said the Croatian should be expected to put pressure on Federer.

"Blisters undermined Cilic in July's Wimbledon final, but the Croat could pose a significant danger to Federer's hopes of a 20th Grand Slam title if fully fit.

"Their head-to-head record doesn't suggest much of a contest, but Cilic can draw inspiration from his one victory.

"He returned superbly in the US Open semi-final of 2014, won in straight sets, and went on to win the title," Fuller wrote.

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