Pupils at Rotokawa School are banging and unscrewing, sanding and painting, and finally reconstructing second-hand bikes.

The 28 boys in the all-boys class at the school have been learning all about bikes and how to upcycle them.

Once done, the aim was to then donate them to children in need in the immediate community.

Teacher Jamal Treanor said the group had been doing the bike project from the start of the term.

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The all-boys class at Rotokawa School is working to refurbish and donate bikes. Photo/Ben Fraser
The all-boys class at Rotokawa School is working to refurbish and donate bikes. Photo/Ben Fraser

They wrote letters to Mitre 10 asking for tools and the store came through with $400 worth.

Treanor said the bike project taught everything from literacy skills, through letter writing and by making written plans, as well as problem solving and teamwork.

"It's really good for the boys to have a lot of hands-on experiences to write about and to problem solve."

The recycling centre at Te Puke helped provide the bicycles for the class.

Jordie Elliott, 10, said his favourite part about the project was taking everything apart and learning how it worked.

"It's a bit more interesting and I like being outside and doing stuff."

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Pupil Da'rell Martin also liked taking the bikes apart and the hands-on nature of the activity.

School pupils Fletcher Saunders, 10, Rapata Te Moana, 9, and Shane Whitiwhiti, 10. Photo/Ben Fraser
School pupils Fletcher Saunders, 10, Rapata Te Moana, 9, and Shane Whitiwhiti, 10. Photo/Ben Fraser

"We get to do things other classes don't do.

"I learn better in this class."

Cameron Kingi-Wilson, 10, said while he enjoyed pulling the bikes apart, he hoped putting them back together would go smoothly too.

Assistant principal Regan Williams said the bike project was a good way for the pupils to learn.

"It's getting them to use their key competencies, their thinking skills, managing themselves.

"It's a good way for the boys to learn while being outside and using their hands."

He expected the project to continue for the rest of the term at least.