Ahimad Nur bows his head in prayer - hands tightly pressed together and tears dropping from his face.

The image of his teacher of more than a decade, Imam Hafiz Musa Patel is firmly pressed in Nur's mind - his mentor was among those brutally murdered on Friday.

"I have never met someone like him. Fiji has lost such a huge person. It is unbelievable. I just couldn't sleep for two nights."

The days following the Christchurch terror attack, where two mosques were targeted, have seen heightened security across the country, but also collective mourning and unity.

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Tributes at the Hawke's Bay Islamic centre in Hastings and a memorial service at Waipatu Marae for the victims of the Christchurch terrorist attack

Sunday morning was no different when more than 400 people were welcomed onto Hastings' Waipatu Marae by Ngāti Kahungunu to pay their respects to the 50 people who lost their lives and the many more who had been injured.

People gathered together at Waipatu Marae, on State Highway 2, just northeast of Hastings to pay their respects to the victims of Friday's terror attack. Photo / Paul Taylor
People gathered together at Waipatu Marae, on State Highway 2, just northeast of Hastings to pay their respects to the victims of Friday's terror attack. Photo / Paul Taylor

Waiata were sung, karakia were said and people, of all denominations and nationalities shared their sentiments.

Ngāti Kahungunu iwi chairman Ngahiwi Tomoana said the gathering was "overwhelming".

"It was a showing of love and compassion. The outpouring of grief, love and peace sends a signal to ourselves in Hawke's Bay that we do care and are willing to stand up and do something," Tomoana said.

Nur, originally from Fiji, but who now resides in Napier was one of the many Muslims who attended.

"This is not New Zealand. We did not expect this to happen in New Zealand."

Among those in attendance were Ikaroa-Rawhiti MP Meka Whaitiri, Tukituki MP Lawrence Yule, regional council chairman Rex Graham and Hastings councillor Henare O'Keefe as well as leaders of different communities within the region.

Hastings mayor Sandra Hazelhurst was visibly emotional.

"Our hearts are broken but we are a nation of one people."

It was "wonderful" that people had come together to heal, she said.

"People are grieving and we need a place to come together and be strong and recognise what the people of Christchurch have gone through. It is a loss to the nation.

"But we are reassured that we have a great country, we have a wonderful community in Hastings."

Hazelhurst visited the mosque on Saturday where she spent time with members of the Islamic community. "It was very healing".

Meka Whaitiri said, like many, she is "overwhelmed with grief and sorrow".

She reiterated Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's comments that "this is not who New Zealand is ... you are us and we are".

"My message is a simple one; it is one of condolences, it is one of peace, love and acceptance."

On Saturday, a small memorial in Taradale was held, where about 80 people turned up, lit candles and sang songs on the corner of Gloucester St and Avondale Rd.

Hundreds of flowers and messages line the fence of the Hawke's Bay Baitul Mokarram Masjid and Islamic Centre Trust, flanked by two police officers.

Board of trustee member and president, Sayeed Ahmed said they appreciated the support from members of the public.

"We are thankful to the New Zealand community and government. They have given their deepest condolences."

He said they were all shocked, but events held by the community helped ease the pain.

"Everybody is shocked - not only the Muslim community but our New Zealand family. We feel we are not alone."

At the time of publication, the mosque remained closed on advice of the police, as did others around the country.

He said it was difficult not being able to go into the mosque.

"Everybody is scared."

Two memorials are yet to take place in the Napier-Hastings area.

At 1pm on Monday the Napier City Council will host a memorial at the Soundshell on Napier's Marine Parade, while at the same time, the Hastings District Council will pay tribute by the Clock Tower.

Hawke's Bay Hospital was placed on lockdown for more than three hours on Saturday afternoon following a report of a
Hawke's Bay Hospital was placed on lockdown for more than three hours on Saturday afternoon following a report of a "threat". Photo / Paul Taylor

Meanwhile, on Saturday afternoon Hawke's Bay Hospital was placed on lockdown for more than three hours.

Police were called about 3.15pm following a report of a threat at the hospital.

A police spokeswoman confirmed the lockdown had ended just after 6.30pm following "extensive enquires" at the hospital and surrounding areas.

"It has been determined there is no threat to hospital staff or the public."

Police would not elaborate further on the nature of the threat or whether it was associated with the Christchurch mosque shootings.