An Auckland GP says he's heartened to hear there's been a change in attitude towards cyclists in the region.

Dr Richard Davies bikes to his work, at the Auckland City Mission's Calder Medical Centre, every day.

He used to ride an ordinary push bike but jumped across to an e-bike in January after realising he wasn't always turning up to work fresh.

"I need to arrive there in a reasonable state. I did cycle a normal bike last year but i just found I'm heading to 60 and I found I was a bit tired and a bit sweaty, there's no shower facilities at work, and the e-bike is faster than a car because traffic is so appalling.

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"It's a real pleasure, I really enjoy it."

He was comforted to hear a change in attitudes amongst the 1459 Aucklanders surveyed by Auckland Transport, 65 per cent of whom believe cycle lanes are good for the city.

Overall, 57 per cent of those surveyed supported cycling.

Cyclist and Auckland City Mission social worker John Bonner died after being hit by a car while riding in his home suburb of Te Atatu Peninsula last December. Photo / File
Cyclist and Auckland City Mission social worker John Bonner died after being hit by a car while riding in his home suburb of Te Atatu Peninsula last December. Photo / File

"I'm really pleased about that. I guess people are changing. You see more cyclists. Congestion is so terrible that if you're sitting in your car and see all the bikes flying past you must think, 'well, maybe that's the way'. But yes, that's good news."

He said most motorists were "courteous and careful".

"They give you a wide berth when they're passing you. There's just the occasional idiot who can't wait or doesn't care or seems to be half blind.

"There might only be one in 100 but the trouble is there's enough of them that you're certainly pretty cautious."

Davies worked with John Bonner who was killed while cycling to work at the mission in December last year.

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Bonner's death hadn't put Davies off cycling, but it had made him and his family more cautious.

"I'm a GP and John was one of the detox social workers and he was absolutely fantastic. We worked together ... and he lived in Te Atatu as well."

Flowers mark the spot on Te Atatu Rd where cyclist John Bonner was fatally hit by a car. Photo / File
Flowers mark the spot on Te Atatu Rd where cyclist John Bonner was fatally hit by a car. Photo / File

Davies said the spot where Bonner was killed, which still bears flowers, was a "well-known hot spot" where all four lanes of traffic merge to get into the suburb of Te Atatu.

"It's a difficult crossing. I'm not sure exactly what happened with John but he wasn't an idiot. You can't help but think about it every time you go past it."

Davies said cycling was good not only for his health but also the planet's health and reduces congestion on the roads.

"Campaigns to encourage better driving probably help but take time. We should assume there are going to be dangerous drivers around for many years to come and design roads and cycle lanes which keep cyclists and pedestrians safe."