A settlement from a 14th century Māori village has been unearthed by archaeologists in Gisborne.

Otago University's Southern Pacific Archaeological Research (SPAR) unit has recently completed it's third visit to Eastland Port in Gisborne.

The find has significance from a scientific and cultural perspective.

Moa bones, fish hooks made of moa bone and stone tools made of obsidian and similar rocks were found during the dig.
Moa bones, fish hooks made of moa bone and stone tools made of obsidian and similar rocks were found during the dig.

Heritage New Zealand granted archaeological consent to the Port in 2016, as part of an ongoing redevelopment project.

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Moa bones, fish hooks made of moa bone and stone tools made of obsidian and similar rocks were found during the dig.

Obsidian, also known as volcanic glass, was used by early Māori settlers as simple cutting tools.

The materials that were found were estimated to date back to the early 1300s.

University of Otago professor of archaeology Richard Walter said uncovering the site was significant from a scientific and cultural perspective.

'We don't know as much about the early occupation around this part of the coastline as we do in other parts of the country," Walter said.

The materials that were found were estimated to date back to the early 1300s.
The materials that were found were estimated to date back to the early 1300s.

"There are not too many of these very early sites and so this one is filling the gaps."

Given the amount of material found at the site, the chances of finding a village within the vicinity are quite high.