An elderly woman was tricked into handing over keys to a campervan, which was then used in a burglary to "completely clear out" a North New Brighton home.

Ina Livingston, 89, felt something was not right when she was persuaded to give the keys to her daughter and son-in-law's campervan.

Livingston was told by the man in his 20s, who knocked on her door, that Peter, Livingston's son-in-law, said he could borrow the van.

He persisted, coming back a second time to say he'd just been on the phone with Peter, who said he could take the van.

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Livingston and her daughter Leslie are unsure how the man knew Peter's name.

Within two hours of the van being stolen, it was used in a burglary of a house in Royalist Ave, North New Brighton.

The burglars were there for 40min.

Homeowner Shane Aitcheson said everything that could be taken, was taken.

CCTV footage of the van before it was used in a burglary on Royalist Ave in North New Brighton. Photo / Supplied
CCTV footage of the van before it was used in a burglary on Royalist Ave in North New Brighton. Photo / Supplied

"The whole place was a rubbish tip, they had not left one thing unturned or looked at. They had gone through the fridge, freezer, the pantry; they had taken the dirty washing. They took everything."

He believes belongings to the value of $20,000 were taken, including snowboard, surfing equipment, power tools and all of their clothing.

"Imagine you don't have any more clothes," said Aitcheson, who had to buy
new clothes for work on Monday.

A neighbour witnessed the campervan entering the property and another neighbour caught CCTV footage of the van on the street.

To make matters worse, a dispute with their insurance company means Mr Aitcheson and his partner are not likely to receive contents insurance, when they were told they were covered.

They are now seeking legal advice.

Police have taken fingerprints and said there are no confirmed sightings of the van yet.

There is no connection between the two parties.

Leslie said the van, named Lucy, was "like a moving bach" to her and her husband.

"We're really attached to it. . . we go away in it all the time, it was stocked with food, dishes, bedding, our tramping boots, books."