Cries of "yes means yes" and "no means no" were heard loud and clear today in central Auckland as a part of the glittery march for consent.

Bare chested men and women adorned themselves with glitter and took to the streets in a show of solidarity with Madeline Anello-Kitzmiller.

Anello-Kitzmille first made headlines when a video of her being assaulted at Rhythm and Vines went viral on Facebook.

In the video, Anello-Kitzmille was walking through the music festival when a man walks up from behind her and grabs her chest - which had been painted at a gypsy stall.

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She used the notoriety of the assault to organise "a glittery march for consent" as a way to highlight issues of consent, sexual abuse and harassment.

Photo / Michael Craig
Photo / Michael Craig

The march rallied together in Victoria Park, where Anello-Kitzmille read a moving poem, before walking to Britomart.

Today, Anello-Kitzmiller said she was not speaking to media because she had already said what she needed to say.

Anello-Kitzmiller's boyfriend Max Ashworth said he was "so proud of Madeline for standing up for what's right no matter what".

Max Ashworth and Madeline Anello-Kitzmiller. Photo / Supplied
Max Ashworth and Madeline Anello-Kitzmiller. Photo / Supplied

The people who had organised the event put their own money towards it and all proceeds from the event would go to charity, he said.

The movement was for everyone, he said.

Auckland resident Elise Leslie was one of about 40 people walking in the march.

She said the video was "not shocking" it today's environment but it was important for people to understand not wearing clothes was not an invitation to be touched.

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As a feminist, she felt it was important to show up and lend her support.

"It's really important to stand up for other woman in our community and look after each other."

Fellow Auckland film students Ysabella Smith and Sophie MacDonell were also there to show their support.

Ysabella Smith. Photo / Michael Craig
Ysabella Smith. Photo / Michael Craig

Smith said the march was all about highlighting the issue of consent.

MacDonell added it was also about desexualising people's bodies and seeing someone as a person rather than a sexual object.

Sophie MacDonnell. Photo / Michael Craig
Sophie MacDonnell. Photo / Michael Craig

Gabrielle Martell-Turner was inspired to speak after the march.

She said it had taken years of counselling to get to the point where she felt she could speak up.

"It feels like the right time," she said.

"Time's up."

She said she wanted the world to be a better place for her children.