The architect of Auckland's Sky Tower is behind plans for a permanent building and base for Team New Zealand's defence of the 36th America's Cup in 2021.

The Herald can reveal the first details for the America's Cup bases in Auckland, which are contained in a resource consent application lodged with Auckland Council on Monday and publicly notified on January 30.

The consent, a huge document with more than 50 supporting reports, will be fast-tracked directly to the Environment Court under a tight timetable for construction to start in September this year and completed for the first teams arrival at the back end of 2019.

Architectural drawings of the proposed Team New Zealand base for the America's Cup at the end of Hobson Wharf. Image / Supplied
Architectural drawings of the proposed Team New Zealand base for the America's Cup at the end of Hobson Wharf. Image / Supplied

The consent is for Auckland Council's favoured Wynyard Basin option for a cluster of bases on a 75m extension to Halsey Wharf, a 75m extension to Hobson wharf, and on the existing Wynyard Wharf.

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The application has been prepared while Economic Development Minister David Parker continues to investigate an alternative land-based option on Wynyard Point, the old Tank Farm site to the west of Wynyard Basin.

Parker told the Herald this week the point option will come down to HASNO (hazardous substances and new organisms) issues related to the southern end of Wynyard Point, where fuel storage tanks are located.

"It may not work out but it's certainly worth looking at because if those issues can be resolved, it could well be a cheaper option by many millions of dollars."

The Wynyard Basin decision carries a price tag of $124 million plus $18m to relocate tenants and landowners. The Wynyard Point option has been priced at $112m plus relocation costs of about $118m - a figure Parker disputes.

The consent application is for eight syndicate bases, five of which will be double bases and three single bases. The single bases will be located on the lower eastern side of Wynyard Point.
The consent application is for eight syndicate bases, five of which will be double bases and three single bases. The single bases will be located on the lower eastern side of Wynyard Point.

The consent application is for eight syndicate bases, five of which will be double bases for two boats and three single bases for one boat. The single bases will be located on the lower eastern side of Wynyard Point.

Each boat shed will have a footprint of 45m by 35 m and be up to 14m in height, plus a launching yard of 45m by 35m.

A 10-year consent is being sought for seven of the bases, but it is proposed that the Team New Zealand base on the extension to Hobson Wharf be a permanent structure.

A three-storey building designed by Moller Architects, who designed the Sky Tower and the ANZ Events centre on nearby Halsey Wharf, will cover 2450sq m for boat facilities and spaces for sponsors, merchandise and public interaction. It will accommodate 110 team staff and up to 300 people for corporate events.

The consent application says the design is high quality and "makes a positive contribution of the area's sense of place, and will provide a positive frontage and visual interest".

Auckland Architect Gordon Moller who designed the Auckland Sky Tower is now involved in designing the America's Cup bases. Photo / Paul Estcourt
Auckland Architect Gordon Moller who designed the Auckland Sky Tower is now involved in designing the America's Cup bases. Photo / Paul Estcourt

Craig Moller, a director of Moller Architects who designed the Sky Tower, said the design philosophy for all eight America's Cup bases is based on a maritime village environment that respects the existing waterfront.

Groups like Stop Stealing Our Harbour and Urban Auckland have expressed concerns about the loss of harbour views from the construction of syndicate bases at the end of Hobson and Halsey Wharves.

The consent application says the three single bases on Wynyard Point involve both temporary and permanent wharf structures and could involve the closure of Brigham St on the eastern side of the point.

As well as wharf extensions, breakwaters made of reinforced concrete piles are proposed to provide shelter for race boats, support crafts and superyachts. Photo / Supplied
As well as wharf extensions, breakwaters made of reinforced concrete piles are proposed to provide shelter for race boats, support crafts and superyachts. Photo / Supplied

As well as wharf extensions, breakwaters made of reinforced concrete piles are proposed to provide shelter for race boats, support crafts and superyachts.
Up to 30 superyacht berths may be accommodated within the wider Wynyard Basin.

Additional superyachts may need to berth on the eastern side of Hobson Wharf with the agreement of the Maritime Museum.

There is a proposal in the consent application to move the Auckland fishing fleet and Sealink ferry service from the Wynyard basin and Wynyard Point areas to the western side of Wynyard Point.

The Seaplane will be relocated from Wynyard Wharf to another location within the wider area.