A police recruitment video that received criticism for violating Sikh tradition has also taken flak for breaching land transport rules.

The "World's Most Entertaining Police Recruitment Video" was launched by NZ Police in November in a bid to attract hundreds of new cops to apply.

The two and a half minute video stars a huge range of New Zealand Police staff in a fun, fast paced sequence.

Despite its light-hearted intention, the video has received complaints from both the Sikh community as well as the national walking and pedestrian organisation Living Streets Aotearoa.

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An earlier Herald article detailed the concerns of Sikh community leader Rajinder Singh after he noticed the video featured an officer, who was not Sikh, wearing an incorrectly wrapped turban.

Constable Heber Gasu, who is Samoan, can be seen in the video wearing the turban as he races through a container yard.

Singh said police "violated tradition" and wished a Sikh officer had been used in the video.

At the time, a police spokeswoman said there was no intention to cause disrespect to the community, but rather to show police welcomed all religions and backgrounds.

The video has since drawn more criticism after Andy Smith, the president Living Streets Aotearoa, noticed several vehicles parked on footpaths during the filming.

One of the instances where Andy Smith, president of Living Streets Aotearoa, alleged the video breached Land Transport Rules. Photo / Supplied
One of the instances where Andy Smith, president of Living Streets Aotearoa, alleged the video breached Land Transport Rules. Photo / Supplied

Smith made a complaint to the Advertising Standards Authority stating the action breached Clause 6.14 of the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004.

The rule states a driver or person in charge of a vehicle must not stop, stand, or park the vehicle on a footpath or on a cycle path.

The ASA Chair noted Smith's concerns but acknowledged that, while not ideal, the scenes were a fleeting part of the overall advertisement.

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The Chair's view was that the advertisement was not promoting parking on the footpath as an appropriate behaviour and it was unlikely to encourage a disregard for safety.

The Chair said the advertisement did not reach the threshold to breach the Code of Ethics and there were no grounds to proceed with the complaint.

In a release, Smith said while the ASA might think the advert was funny, Living Streets was not laughing.

"This is the problem, the people who own cars think they can park on the footpath. That is wrong and should not be promoted in any advertisement.

"Give footpaths back to those who walk, run, wheelchair and push babies."

Living Streets Aotearoa seeks to provide a positive voice for people on foot and works to promote walking-friendly planning and development around the country.