Government agencies have moved in to help with the Auckland Airport fuel crisis that has already affected thousands of passengers' travel plans.

And more flights are due to be affected in the coming days; particularly trans-tasman and domestic legs.

Energy and resources minister Judith Collins and top officials from government agencies were yesterday in discussions with the Defence Force and other associated parties including airline representatives and those from fuel companies.

The talks also involved Refining NZ, which owns the Marsden Point pipeline that burst on Thursday, leaving Auckland Airport with only 30 per cent of its normal fuel usage available.

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Collins said the latest information was that aviation fuel supplies in Auckland remained of "most concern,'' but that worry would not flow on to motorists' fuel supply.

"It's been made very clear to all of those working on this that the Government will commit whatever resources and effort are required to get this sorted out as quickly as possible with a minimum disruption.

"The nature of the damage means repair isn't quick and the work has to be done very carefully.

"But if any additional personnel or expertise from the Defence Force can speed the work up in any way, then they'll be made available.''

The Defence Force will use the tanker HMNZS Endeavour to move diesel fuel from Marsden Point to other parts of the country. Photo / File
The Defence Force will use the tanker HMNZS Endeavour to move diesel fuel from Marsden Point to other parts of the country. Photo / File

The Defence Force has been tasked with using the naval tanker HMNZS Endeavour to move diesel fuel from Marsden Point to other parts of the country.

To do that the Defence Force had to cancel a major exercise in Singapore to save fuel and was providing up to 20 additional tanker drivers to help local operators.

The Government was also trying to get more tankers on the road which could deliver fuel to Auckland and this included easing regulations around hours of work or weight restrictions.

A spokesman for Refining NZ said last night they were running on schedule with their plan to return the damaged pipeline to service and getting jet fuel delivered back into Wiri Oil Services Ltd.

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Jet fuel was to be delivered between next Sunday and the following Tuesday.

"From that point we estimate it will take another 30 hours for the jet fuel to settle, for recertification to be obtained and to transport to the airport for final use.

Passengers at Auckland International Airport yesterday. Photo / Jason Oxenham
Passengers at Auckland International Airport yesterday. Photo / Jason Oxenham

A repair team had made good progress on repairs to the pipeline.

Meanwhile, passengers travelling in and out of Auckland over the next few days are being urged to contact their airline or stay updated via the airport's website for updates.

Most flights were going ahead, but some airlines had reduced schedules for the next week due to the jet fuel shortage. A total of 27 flights were affected over the weekend.

Air New Zealand said it was planning further cuts to its service over the next few days because it was still using too much fuel despite cancelling four trans-tasman and 14 domestic flights.

The airline warned there would be further disruptions to its domestic jet, regional and trans-tasman flights.

Long-haul flights leaving Auckland last night had to make refuelling stops at various airports in Australia and Pacific nations.