The head of the company which employed a young Indian security guard who was killed on his first night at work has been called to give evidence at a Coroner's inquest.

Cherag Elavia is outlining the briefing he gave to Charanpreet Dhaliwal on the night he was attacked on a west Auckland building site in 2011.

The 22-year-old student had been called in to cover for another worker.

Mr Elavia said he met Mr Dhaliwal at the building site 15 minutes before his night shift was due to start, gave him a free 0800 number to call and checked that he had his own mobile phone.

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Mr Dhaliwal told him he had experience, Mr Elavia said, and he took him at his word.

Mr Dhaliwal could have called an 0800 number, or 111, if he was in trouble, Mr Elavia said.

Asked if Mr Dhaliwal's training was specific to crowd control, Mr Elavia said he wouldn't distinguish between the two types of training.

He said training in the security industry was a farce.Asked if he now thought Mr Dhaliwal had the training and knowledge to do the job, he said he didn't have access to Dhaliwal's logbooks. He'd need them to make a decision.

Evidence from the criminal trial indicated Mr Dhaliwal may have been in a car before approaching a group of men on the night of his death.

Mr Elavia said to approach them would have been inappropriate. Common sense would have dictated he should have stayed in the car, he said.

"I would have stayed in the car if it was me."

Mr Elavia said the site was considered low risk.

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He offered a cheque for $50.05 to police for Mr Dhaliwal's work. They said it should go to his estate.

People made fun of him for giving "pittance" and said it was "blood money". He said he was just paying what Mr Dhaliwal was due.

A lawyer for Mr Dhaliwal's family, Jeff Sissons, asked the witness whether a panic button on a cellphone or a radio telephone would have led to help arriving sooner.

The lawyer told Mr Elavia he disagreed with his statement.

Asked if Mr Dhaliwal's training was specific to crowd control, Mr Elavia said he wouldn't distinguish between the two types of training.

He said training in the security industry was a farce.