Kaikohe netballers have launched a campaign to improve the behaviour and safety of players, spectators and officials by promoting positive and healthy lifestyles at their games.

The Safe Whanau Environments Positive Sideline Behaviour campaign, a joint project between Bay of Islands Netball and Hauora Hokianga, supported by the Far North District Council, Te Runanga-a-Iwi o Ngapuhi and Te Hau Ora o Ngapuhi, was launched at the start of the new season on Saturday, with the revealing of six signs at Lindvart Park featuring photos of local players, coaches and officials with messages that promote positive play and relationships.

One of the 'positive lifestyle' signs that were unveiled in Kaikohe on Saturday.
One of the 'positive lifestyle' signs that were unveiled in Kaikohe on Saturday.

Those include 'Positive actions promote positive play,' 'Positive reinforcement promotes positive results,' and 'Inspiring play promotes others to aspire.'

Bay of Islands Netball Centre (BOINC) chair Lisa Brophy said the campaign was fronted by representative coaching staff, officials, players and whanau.

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"We knew these would be the best people to front our campaign. They are our present and future leaders, our motivators and the ones to aspire and encourage good on-court and sideline behaviour," she said, adding that the BOINC had received many complaints in the past about unacceptable sideline and on-court behaviour.

"This is a problem nationwide, but we decided to do something to stop it at our games," she said.

"Our objective is to promote positive, healthy lifestyles for players, officials, tamariki and whanau by enforcing a smoke-free, alcohol-free, drug-free and violence-free environment at our games."

Players and spectators who ignored the rules would be reprimanded within the rules and regulations of the BOINC.

Saturday's launch began with a karakia, followed by the unveiling of the signs and light refreshments, Ms Brophy saying she hoped the initiative would be adopted by other netball organisations in NZ.