A Northland family's harrowing domestic violence journey has been made into a documentary which encourages people to speak out and seek help.

The powerful DVD titled Enough is Enough is a 24-minute documentary in memory of Patricia Ann McGrath, also known as Wowo, who was killed by an act of violence in January.

Phillip Andre Mahanga assaulted 34-year-old Patricia in a house on Fairway Drive in Kamo.

The mother-of-two was taken to Whangarei Hospital with head injuries. But four days later she was taken off life support and died, surrounded by family.

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Mahanga, 33, was sentenced to three years in jail for the manslaughter.

Yesterday in a special blessing ceremony, members of the McGrath family, friends, workmates, District Health Board representatives and police officers who worked on the case gathered to watch the DVD.

The opening moments feature the 111 call made to emergency services with the names of those killed in domestic violence incidents flashing up on a black background.

In an emotional address to those gathered, John McGrath, Patricia's brother, said it was nearly eight months since the tragic death and it was still very raw for the family.

"It's pretty powerful and if it means we can help families and stop this happening to others, well it's worth it," Mr McGrath said.

During the documentary, Mr McGrath said it was time for leaders in the community to stand up against violence.

"In the Maori world the first person to be created was Hineahuone - a female. Women should be held up there - they are really tapu - we need to worship our women. For this to happen from our own men is mind blowing - it should not happen, it should not happen, enough is enough."

Detective Sergeant Shane Pilmer advised people if they noticed warning signs to report them to police.

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"Any sort of abuse, report it to police then we can start intervening," he said.

Whangarei police area Commander Inspector Tracy Phillips said the video was a massive resource and would be used with families identified as high risk.

"We want to make a difference and by getting people to watch this DVD we will get them to understand the ripple effect of domestic violence and the impact it has on families and communities."

DVD co-producer Liz Inch, of the Northland DHB, said the three main messages were "enough is enough", "speak out against family violence" and "seek help".

She said the DVD would be played on a television in the emergency department at Whangarei Hospital and would be distributed to Kaitaia Hospital also. Police, Work and Income and non government agencies such as Family Works, Victim Support, Women's Refuge, Lifeline and the Salvation Army would also get copies.

Fellow producer Dean Whitehead said it had been an emotional exercise editing all the interviews to produce the final documentary.

"I think if it stops one person from raising their fists or makes a person think twice about what they are doing then it's done its job."

As the credits rolled Kerikeri High School student singer-songwriter Summer Ash, 17, sang her song Enough is Enough that was chosen as the theme song for the DVD.

The DVD project was funded by New Zealand police, the Ministry of Social Development's It's Not Ok campaign and the Northland District Health Board.

To see the DVD go to YouTube.

It's okay to ask for help. If you are worried about someone or need help, call the Family Violence Information Line on 0800 456 450.