Students and staff aren't the only ones buzzing at Kawakawa School - finally, bees are too.

After a lengthy process and a bit of a rollercoaster ride, a beehive has landed at the Bay of Islands school.

Teacher Dana Cowles said the hive had been a long time coming so she was excited to finally have it.

"One of the kids said to me 'to be honest miss, I didn't think it was going to look as good as it has come up,' so with all the hard work we've put in to it over the year, to finally have it now is really cool," she said.

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Cowles said the journey to the beehive took longer than expected.

It started off with excitement after the school received a $1000 Countdown grant earlier this year to get a beehive project under way. That turned to upset after initially being told by Far North District Council (FNDC) they were not allowed to have the hives, then there was hope after the Northern Advocate made inquiries and FNDC said the school can apply for a licence to have hives.

Kawakawa School's beehive. Photo / Michael Cunningham
Kawakawa School's beehive. Photo / Michael Cunningham

In April the council issued that licence and throughout term three students worked hard to transform a grass area behind the classrooms into a sanctuary for the bees complete with hexagonal garden beds with bee-friendly plants.

"They were all pretty stoked. I think alot of them were really proud of how it's turned out. It'll be cool once they get used to the bees and realise they're not going to hurt them so that we can even get some tables out here that they can come and do work."

Cowles said the hive is a massive learning tool.

"Ultimately we want the students to keep the knowledge of how important the bees actually are to our world and our survival. I also want them to learn how honey is made, the processes that the bees go through."

Kawakawa School teacher Dana Cowles with students Louie-John Maihi, 11, Qaiden Norman, 12 (front) Payton Maihi, 13, Ocean Vlaardingerbroek, 13 and Tunisia Wilson 13 (back). Photo / Michael Cunningham
Kawakawa School teacher Dana Cowles with students Louie-John Maihi, 11, Qaiden Norman, 12 (front) Payton Maihi, 13, Ocean Vlaardingerbroek, 13 and Tunisia Wilson 13 (back). Photo / Michael Cunningham

Student Louie John Maihi, 11, thought the bees were "really cool".

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"I like that we have insects out the back. It helps me get over the fear of bees and it teaches me more about them," he said.

Meanwhile, Ocean Vlaardingerbroek, 13, has already become more confident around bees.

"You just have to be calm around them. We did a challenge and they actually didn't come by us. I'd like to learn about the queen bee and all the other bees."