Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs is a beloved Disney classic, but a devastating fan theory suggests that the film's heroine actually dies at the end — and the prince is the Grim Reaper whose kiss is actually the kiss of death.

Inspired by a 19th-century German fairy tale, the movie was released in 1937 as Disney's first full-length animated film, but Snow White's so-called 'happy ending' might not have been so happy, reports Daily Mail.

The disturbing theory that is making its way around the internet appears to have originated from the comments section of a 2016 Buzzfeed article, and it has undoubtedly broken more than a few hearts.

The in-depth argument that Snow White actually dies at the end of the flick was written by a commenter named Matt Morgan, who claimed there are many people who believe the raven haired beauty's "happily ever after" is all a lie.

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"It looks like she dies at the end of the movie, just like the real Snow White, but it's done in a way to look like a happy ending to little kids so they don't freak out," he explained. "Re-watch as an adult and see for yourself."

Matt went on to reference the 16th century German aristocrat Margaretha von Waldeck, who some believe was the inspiration behind the fairy tale.

The disturbing theory that has resurfaced appears to have originated from Matt Morgan's lengthy comment on a 2016 article about the origin stories of Disney films. Photo / Facebook
The disturbing theory that has resurfaced appears to have originated from Matt Morgan's lengthy comment on a 2016 article about the origin stories of Disney films. Photo / Facebook

Margaretha lived in a mining town that employed child workers, so it was theorized that the seven dwarfs in the story are actually a reference to child labor.

When she was a teenager, she moved out of her father's home and her beauty attracted the attention of Philip II of Spain while she was in Brussels.

She became mysteriously ill and died at the age of 21. It was widely thought that she was poisoned because someone didn't want her marrying Philip. Sound familiar?

"They were sad when she died and immortalized her with the story of Snow White," Matt explained. "The Brothers Grimm didn't actually write stories, rather they traveled and recorded local tales, eventually coming across Snow White."

Could it be? In his argument, Matt referenced the 16th century German aristocrat Margaretha von Waldeck (pictured), who some believe was the inspiration behind the fairy tale. Photo / Supplied
Could it be? In his argument, Matt referenced the 16th century German aristocrat Margaretha von Waldeck (pictured), who some believe was the inspiration behind the fairy tale. Photo / Supplied

However, while Margaretha did have a strict stepmother when she was growing up, the woman was already dead and thus not a suspect.

It's also important to note that Matt's theory focuses solely on Margaretha, but she is not the only woman who is believed to be the real-life Snow White.

"So in the movie, the prince is supposed to be kind of like an angel of death, basically a happier version of a grim reaper," he argued. "When Snow is being careless around the well at the beginning of the movie, the 'prince' hears her and goes to investigate.

"She gets her first glimpse at the prince when she gets her first glimpse at death; when she almost falls into the well and dies."

To argue his point further, he went on to say that the prince came to see Snow White a second time after she bit the poison apple and was lying in a coffin.

Heaven? Matt claimed that the castle-shaped cloud that Snow White and the prince ride off to at the end of the film represents the afterlife. Photo / Disney
Heaven? Matt claimed that the castle-shaped cloud that Snow White and the prince ride off to at the end of the film represents the afterlife. Photo / Disney

"He arrives on a pale white horse (which is what Death was often portrayed riding at the time). He kisses her," he wrote. "The 'kiss of death' is a way people knew someone had passed before they knew about taking pulses.

"When you die, the air is expelled from your lungs. Folklore said this was death kissing you to take the 'breath of life' from you."

As for the final scene, Matt said Snow White's death was the reason why the seven dwarfs had to stay behind.

"Snow and the Prince say goodbye to the dwarfs rather than bring them along because they're going somewhere the living can't follow," he added.

"They then ride off to heaven or a heaven-facsimile afterlife, where we see the last shot of the movie: a castle-shaped cloud surrounded by golden light."

Whether people choose to believe it or not, it is probably safe to say that many adults are seeing the film in a whole new light.