We have all stuffed a pair of flats in our bag ahead of a big night out, and it seems even the Queen comes armed with a second pair of shoes.

The monarch was spotted in not one but two pairs of shoes during the RAF centenary on Tuesday.

She arrived at Westminster Abbey dressed in a bright blue and green ensemble and wearing a pair of patent leather low-heeled shoes.

But by the time she reached Buckingham Palace just an hour and a half later she was seen wearing an entirely different pair.

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As she walked alongside Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier ahead of the RAF flyover, she had slipped into a pair of black loafers with a golden buckle.

The custom made loafers that feature a golden "horsebit" design are made by West London shoemaker Anello & Davide - a brand that Her Majesty has been wearing for fifty years.

Known as her "work" shoes, they are handmade from the finest calf leather with a brass clasp or a small bow.

Within two hours she had changed into a pair of black leather loafers with a horsebit buckle. Photo / Getty Images
Within two hours she had changed into a pair of black leather loafers with a horsebit buckle. Photo / Getty Images

It takes a team of four to produce the classic black numbers (she has other colours in the same style) which cost about £1,000.

The team works from a wooden "last" made from measurements of the Queen's foot, and include a pattern cutter; a clicker, who selects the leather; a closer, who sews the upper part and adds stiffeners; and, finally, a maker, who adds the sole and heel on the last.

Then there'll be a fitting at the Palace, and — after any final adjustments, including a clean and polish — they're ready

The Queen's selection includes plain black leather, black patent, white leather and beige leather, and three designs of evening shoe in satin, silver and gold. They are all hand-dyed and water-repellent.

The heel is chunky and 2¼ in high, with a raised insole to give the royal size 4s an added lift in the arch. If she is likely to be walking on uneven surfaces, the heel will be lower.

The monarch reportedly has a junior member of Buckingham Palace staff, dubbed 'Cinders', who has the job of wearing in her shoes ahead of wearing them.