As a sky lantern rose above Claudelands Park, it illuminated the more than 3000 people who came together in unity on Saturday night to show support for the local, and national Muslim community.

The vigil was organised to mark the tragic events that took place in Christchurch on Friday afternoon, where a gunmen attacked two Mosques, killing 49 people.

Black, white, young, old, men, woman and children, from many ethnicities and religious backgrounds, came together in the park opposite Hamilton's Jamia Masjid Mosque in Heaphy Terrace.

Three thousand Hamiltonians attended the vigil at Claudelands Park on Saturday night. Photo / Tom Rowland
Three thousand Hamiltonians attended the vigil at Claudelands Park on Saturday night. Photo / Tom Rowland

There was silence, there was laughter.

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There were tears, and there were hugs, but as Waikato Muslim Association president, Dr Asad Mohsin said, "some good comes out of every bad."

"We, as the Muslim community. We are going to engage with the community more strongly, we are going to be a part of you, and you are going to be a part of us. Remember us in your prayers."

"We are so overwhelmed by the support shown, and we are thinking how can ever pay back this love and affection we have received."

His speech was met by a standing ovation from the thousands of Hamiltonians that had gathered.

Hamilton Mayor Andrew King said that New Zealand is known for its love.

"We care for each other, regardless of where we come from," Mr King said.

"We are known for our unity, and our resilience."

"Tonight we stand strong with our fellow New Zealanders in the darkest of hours."

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The Most Reverend Philip Richardson told the crowd to turn to the stranger next to them and to tell them they are loved and beautiful.

Waikato Muslim Association president, Dr Asad Mohsin. Photo / Peter Tiffany
Waikato Muslim Association president, Dr Asad Mohsin. Photo / Peter Tiffany

He spoke to the crowd, saying that they had all united because they had recognised the inhumanity of the events in Christchurch.

"We know that we must never judge another faith, by those who in act in extreme ways in the name of that faith," Mr Richardson said.

Hamilton man Afzer Zameer came along with a sign he made expressing his feelings for New Zealand.

Mr Zameer, a member of the local mosque, said: "We all love Kiwis and we all love New Zealand. I think new arrivals love New Zealand even more than Kiwis because we appreciate NZ more than many Kiwis."

"But we are all just one, we all love rugby and cricket the same and we all bleed the same colour."

Led by a choir, the crowd sang 'Walk in Love' to come together to remember the 49 that had lost their lives, before a roaring rendition of New Zealand's national anthem.

Hamilton man Afzer Zameer came along with a sign he made expressing his feelings for New Zealand. Photo / Peter Tiffany
Hamilton man Afzer Zameer came along with a sign he made expressing his feelings for New Zealand. Photo / Peter Tiffany

Since Friday night, outside Jamia Masjid Mosque, hundreds have laid flowers and covered the footpath in chalk messages, in different languages from around the world.

The messages all echo similar meanings, saying "This is your home," "Let's stand together - never again," and "We love you."