The family of a 2-year-old who has been fighting for her life in Starship after a horrific crash now face an impossible choice - whether to turn off her breathing machine.

Amirah Najim-Phillips was travelling home to Wellington from Auckland with her mother Daelyn Phillips, 23, father Mohammed Najim, 21, and sister Zahara, 4 on June 13 when they were involved in a head-on crash near Waiouru.

Two-year-old Amirah Najim-Phillips has been in Starship ICU for a month after a serious crash near Waiouru on June 13. Photo / Supplied
Two-year-old Amirah Najim-Phillips has been in Starship ICU for a month after a serious crash near Waiouru on June 13. Photo / Supplied

It's thought a car coming the other way overtook a truck and was on the wrong side of the road when it smashed into them. Amirah took most of the impact, which snapped her spinal cord and left her unable to move.

One person died in the crash, police said at the time. Mohammed broke his leg and Zahara, while unhurt, was traumatised, mother Daelyn wrote in a Facebook post.

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The crash is believed to have been caused by a car overtaking a truck and hitting Amirah's family's car on the wrong side of the road. Photo / Alex Campbell
The crash is believed to have been caused by a car overtaking a truck and hitting Amirah's family's car on the wrong side of the road. Photo / Alex Campbell

The 2-year-old has been in intensive care at Starship Children's Hospital since the crash.

She can only move her right arm and is finding it hard to breathe on her own. After almost a month in intensive care in Starship, on Sunday the couple got the news "no parent ever wants to hear".

"My baby's condition has deteriorated, and her lungs and breathing have become worse. The doctors have told us today that we have to make a choice.

"To turn off the breathing machine and let our beautiful baby girl pass on her own, or, to leave her on the machine, but she will eventually pass away and may cause her pain and suffering."

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Doctors had told the couple that their daughter would likely get very sick and die if she stayed on the ventilator because of a high risk of infection.

But without it she would struggle to breathe and would only last a few hours.

Amirah's parents Mohammed Nathan Najim and partner Daelyn Phillips were involved in the crash. They are hoping to bring her home to Wellington to make some memories. Photo / Michael Craig
Amirah's parents Mohammed Nathan Najim and partner Daelyn Phillips were involved in the crash. They are hoping to bring her home to Wellington to make some memories. Photo / Michael Craig

The couple are making the heartbreaking decision to bring their baby girl home to be with whānau in Wellington for a few days before she dies.

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"Being 23 years old, and having to plan my daughter's funeral, while raising another young daughter, and supporting my partner is emotionally exhausting, and I am asking for help from you all. My baby girl did not deserve this, none of us deserved this," Phillips wrote.

A Facebook fundraiser to help with the funeral and the costs of staying in Auckland had raised just over $6000 this morning.

Before the accident, Amirah was a "perfect little girl", Daelyn told the Herald last month.

"She was living life and learning about everything. She loved singing and was just a lovely little girl, so kind and caring."

Amirah (left) with big sister Zahara, 4. The family were celebrating Zahara's birthday in Auckland before the horror crash. Photo / Supplied
Amirah (left) with big sister Zahara, 4. The family were celebrating Zahara's birthday in Auckland before the horror crash. Photo / Supplied