We've come to expect a more low-maintenance approach when it comes to Meghan and Harry - which is part of why people like them as it's an idea that sits with our national preference for casual, relaxed dressing.

To keep things fresh and casual for their first engagement yesterday the couple met with young people at Wellington institution Maranui Cafe in Lyall Bay. Meghan wore a black knit by Australian brand Jac + Jack, and a trench coat from American label Club Monaco made from 100 per cent lyocell with oversized lapels, similar to the cream version she wore at the announcement of her engagement to Prince Harry last year.

During her meeting, she pinned the 1737 badge to her lapel - a reference to a free, 24/7, text or call service for mental health support.

It showcases her ability to make the most of every photo opportunity and create more awareness around the cause she and Harry are here to support and engage with.

Advertisement

She also wore a pair of jeans by Outland Denim, a socially conscious denim brand that aims to help young women in Cambodia by providing them safe employment, and has worn them several times during the tour.

Meghan's Outland Denim jeans reflected her yen for brands with a social conscience. Photo / Pool
Meghan's Outland Denim jeans reflected her yen for brands with a social conscience. Photo / Pool

Working with local women, the label gives them the opportunity to earn a living wage, provide support for their families and, in some instances, saves their lives from human traffickers preying on young women to work in the sex industry.

It's brands like this with a social conscience that appeal to Meghan in her wardrobe decisions, brands with an ethical or sustainable message imbued into their designs, in tune with how consumers of her generation are buying fashion right now. The jeans worn last week in Sydney led to a 1000 per cent traffic spike on Outland.com in the first 48 hours, and resulted in a 375 per cent daily sales spike.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex visit Totaranui Campground in the Abel Tasman National Park. Photo / Pool
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex visit Totaranui Campground in the Abel Tasman National Park. Photo / Pool

It's an example of why what the royals wear matters when it comes to supporting manufacturers, makers and their families. Her Stuart Weitzman lace-up boots were swiftly replaced by white sneakers for a trail walk in Abel Tasman National Park later in the day, throwing on a raincoat and scarf to keep the rain and cold at bay. Prince Harry wore a complementary look - grey knit sweater, trousers and tan desert boots, later wearing a black puffer jacket during the walk.

Great to see that despite the fuss and formality tied to their roles, they can still do casual like the rest of us.