Sir Bradley Wiggins has defended his decision to use Triamcinolone but denies '100 per cent' using the drug to cheat.

The reputations of Wiggins and Sir David Brailsford appeared in ruins on Monday after an explosive parliamentary report accused them of cheating to win the 2012 Tour de France.

Wiggins was also accused of using the drug Triamcinolone nine times in total - something he refutes, the Daily Mail reports.

The 37-year-old was on the offensive on BBC News this morning (NZT), suggesting he would have had more rights 'if I had murdered someone'.

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Wiggins was questioned whether he and Team Sky crossed the line in pursuit of the 2012 victory.

"No we didn't," Wiggins said. 'Not at any time during my career did we cross the ethical line. As I've said before I had a medical condition that I went to a doctor... this has been being treated since back in 2003 when I was diagnosed with it through the doctors at British Cycling at that time.

"This was the treatment that I'd been prescribed for that particular occasion which was, what, seven years ago now.

"And under specialist supervision as well. And in place of the rules at that time, which you were allowed to apply for use for this medication. This wasn't a medication that was abused in order to gain an advantage."

The admission that the use of Triamcinolone by Wiggins and Team Sky was unethical was made by Shane Sutton, who coached Wiggins to that first British victory in France and Olympic gold in London nine days later.

He was also Brailsford's right-hand man at both Sky and British Cycling. Sutton's statement alone is hugely damaging to Wiggins, Brailsford and Team Sky.

Wiggins was asked what he thought of Sutton's comments that the use of the drug was 'unethical'.

He replied: "Yeah that hurts me actually. Shane knows... knows around that time exactly what and why I was taking those... that medication."

Wiggins said that '100 per cent' didn't cheat before choosing to hit back at the media and MPs the personal damage he has suffered.

He said: "These allegations... I mean it's the worst thing to be accused of. I've said that before. But it's also the hardest thing to prove you haven't done because we're not dealing in a legal system. I'd have had more rights if I'd murdered someone in this process.

"I've been gagged for the last 18 months because there was a legal investigation going on, so I couldn't say anything. Then still waiting on this DCMS report. I've never been asked... or these allegations have never been put to me before until now. I've only found out today what I've been accused of."

The Daily Mail's revelations about a medical package ordered by Team Sky for Wiggins in June 2011 — a Jiffy bag that allegedly contained Triamcinolone — led to an investigation by UK Anti-Doping and formed a significant part of the DCMS inquiry into the abuse of performance-enhancing drugs in sport.

Roan asked Wiggins to explain what was in the jiffy bag - something Wiggins wasn't able to do.

He added: "God knows. Your guess is as good as mine.

"That package as we've been told in the Houses of Parliament contained Fluimucil. I had Fluimucil that night. Whether it came out of that package or not, maybe it did. If they were short of it and they needed more brought out then maybe yeah. I was on fluimucil that whole week.

"I'm having... trying to be in retirement and do other things in my life. And I'm having to... you know just the effect it's had, the widespread effect on the family is just horrific and I'm going to have to... I don't know how I'm going to pick the pieces up with the kids and stuff... and I'm left to do that, as well as trying to keep my... salvage my reputation from this. I mean it's just... I wouldn't wish it upon anyone."

FULL BBC TRANSCRIPT
Dan Roan: The report by the DCMS Select Committee says that you crossed the ethical line. Is that fair? Did you?

Bradley Wiggins: No we didn't. Not at any time during my career did we cross the ethical line. As I've said before I had a medical condition that I went to a doctor... this has been being treated since back in 2003 when I was diagnosed with it through the doctors at British Cycling at that time. This was the treatment that I'd been prescribed for that particular occasion which was, what, seven years ago now. And under specialist supervision as well. And in place of the rules at that time, which you were allowed to apply for use for this medication. This wasn't a medication that was abused in order to gain an advantage.

DR: That's not what your former coach Shane Sutton says. He says that your use of that drug was 'unethical'.

BW: Yeah that hurts me actually. Shane knows... knows around that time exactly what and why I was taking those... that medication.

DR: So only one other time did you use triamcinolone, other than the three TUEs we know about?

BW: Yes.

DR: But the report says... they suggest you may have taken it nine times in four years.

BW: Yeah... now this... I don't know where that's come from. I really would like to know where this has come from. This is an anonymous source. This is an anonymous person that has said this.

DR: Doesn't mean it's wrong though, you're saying this is a lie.

BW: Absolutely. I refute that 100 per cent. This is... I... this is malicious. This... this is a direct... this is someone trying to smear me.

DR: So sitting here now, Sir Brad, you can categorically say that you didn't cheat?

BW: 100 per cent.

DR: You didn't abuse the TUE system?

BW: Never throughout my career, no. I haven't worked and had the passion I've had for this sport for 15-20 years... You got, jerseys, I'm doing a book. I've been writing a book in here all morning about the love of the sport... to do that to the sport. I mean it's just absurd. These allegations... I mean it's the worst thing to be accused of. I've said that before. But it's also the hardest thing to prove you haven't done because we're not dealing in a legal system. I'd have had more rights if I'd murdered someone in this process. I've been gagged for the last 18 months because there was a legal investigation going on, so I couldn't say anything. Then still waiting on this DCMS report. I've never been asked... or these allegations have never been put to me before until now. I've only found out today what I've been accused of. I mean, the whole jiffy bag thing was just a shambles.

DR: What was in the jiffy bag?

BW: God knows. Your guess is as good as mine.

That package as we've been told in the Houses of Parliament contained fluimucil. I had fluimucil that night. Whether it came out of that package or not, maybe it did. If they were short of it and they needed more brought out then maybe yeah. I was on fluimucil that whole week.

I'm having... trying to be in retirement and do other things in my life. And I'm having to... you know just the effect it's had, the widespread effect on the family is just horrific and I'm going to have to... I don't know how I'm going to pick the pieces up with the kids and stuff... and I'm left to do that, as well as trying to keep my... salvage my reputation from this. I mean it's just... I wouldn't wish it upon anyone.