Black Caps batsman Mitchell Santner winced in alarm as he watched his six fly into the head of a security guard during the second test against England yesterday.

The Red Badge staff member was sitting on the boundary as Santner hooked English bowler Jofra Archer for six in New Zealand's first innings at Hamilton.

The ball hit the man's forehead and then also hit a woman walking past at Seddon Park.

A security member was struck on the head by a six from New Zealand batsman Mitchell Santner on Saturday. Photo / Sky Sport.
A security member was struck on the head by a six from New Zealand batsman Mitchell Santner on Saturday. Photo / Sky Sport.

Head groundsman Karl Johnson quickly checked on the health of the security member, who appeared ok after the blow but was later removed from duties to be further assessed.

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Santner was caught soon after off the Archer.

Ending day two of the second test in Hamilton at 39-2 in response to New Zealand's 375, it will take a mighty effort with the bat for England to find themselves in a position of dominance.

But, as Broad explained in an insightful post-match press conference, that was their plan all along.

"We won the toss and bowled - not to bowl New Zealand out for 150, we were aiming [to dismiss them] for 330-350 and then bat big once to try and win the game. We thought our best chance to take 20 wickets in five days was by bowling first.

"These pitches, you've got to change your mindset a little bit. If you win the toss and bowl in England and concede 370 you'd be distraught, but here the opportunity is to bat big and bat big once. For us to win this game, we'll need a batter to get 150+, and someone else to get 100, and leave ourselves a day to bowl them out on day five. That's how New Zealand won the last test they played [in Hamilton], when they got [715]-6. So arguably, they're 300 under par," Broad said.