Northlanders stood with their Muslim community in solidarity and respect as they fell silent at 1.32pm yesterday to honour the 50 people killed in the Christchurch mosque terror attacks.

At the Northland Islamic Centre in Whangārei, members of the region's Muslim community gathered for prayer and were supported by more than 150 non-Muslim members of the community.

About 100 people were inside the centre during prayer, including about 60 non-muslims. About 100 more people were gathered outside.

Tash Webb and Zeiff Rolton with their baby Ivy who was born last Friday hours after the terror attacks. Photo/John Stone
Tash Webb and Zeiff Rolton with their baby Ivy who was born last Friday hours after the terror attacks. Photo/John Stone

Saeed Hoque performed the call to prayer, before those in attendance fell silent for two minutes.

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Imam Suhil Musa thanked the community for coming, before going inside to pray.

"From the deep of our hearts we thank all of you for coming."

Claire Bracey with her two year old son Arlo show their support. Photo/John Stone
Claire Bracey with her two year old son Arlo show their support. Photo/John Stone

He said he really appreciated what the community has done and their support.

"His message was to divide us but we are united. We are one, there is not place for hatred in New Zealand."

Musa finished by calling for a round of applause for "the Prime Minister, the authorities, the doctors, the police and for anyone including you".

A large crowd attends the Northland Islamic Centre as a sign of unity. Photo/John Stone
A large crowd attends the Northland Islamic Centre as a sign of unity. Photo/John Stone

Armed police officers kept watch over the centre from the end of the short driveway.

Members of the public laid flowers outside the centre and read the messages of support which had been sent to the centre and were displayed on boards outside. Many women wore headscarves in solidarity.

Claire and Mike Bracey had bought two of their children, aged two and four, along and said they were there to show respect and solidarity.

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One of the many cards and letters which had been sent to the centre in the wake of the attacks. Photo/John Stone
One of the many cards and letters which had been sent to the centre in the wake of the attacks. Photo/John Stone

"And we bought the kids because we're not afraid," Claire said.

Ian Pritchard said he was there because he "wanted to do something tangible" rather than just liking or sharing something on social media.

"I wanted to turn up and be present and show my respects."

Armed Police kept watch over the centre from the end of the short driveway. Photo/John Stone
Armed Police kept watch over the centre from the end of the short driveway. Photo/John Stone

Renee Clark from the He Matariki Teen Parent School wanted to show respect.

"This isn't New Zealand and it's so sad, we've just come to pay our respects. We're all one race, we're all one people. I don't get why it's happened, it's disgusting really, it's put New Zealand on the map in a bad way."

David Lawson was there with his wife Cath and son Luca. He was driving home last Friday with his two sons in the car when they heard the news.

Saeed Hoque A large crowd attended The Northland Islamic Centre as a sign of unity. 22 March 2019 Northern Advocate photograph by John Stone
Saeed Hoque A large crowd attended The Northland Islamic Centre as a sign of unity. 22 March 2019 Northern Advocate photograph by John Stone

"We've been talking through the week about how upsetting it was and how wrong and we thought it was important to love and support our fellow New Zealanders."

Zeniff Rolton and Tash Webb's daughter Ivy was born last Friday after the terror attacks.

"So after all the calamities and terror of the day we had some joy."

Imam Suhil Musa thanked the large crowd. Photo/ John Stone
Imam Suhil Musa thanked the large crowd. Photo/ John Stone

Rolton said it's a day they will always remember, for both the birth of their child and the loss of life.

At Whangārei's Anglican Church about 80 worshippers from various denominations gathered to mark the occasion at 1.30pm.

The church held prayers at the five traditional Muslim times of prayers.

Flowers were laid outside the Northland Islamic Centre. Photo/ John Stone
Flowers were laid outside the Northland Islamic Centre. Photo/ John Stone

Reverend Peter Minson said next Friday Anglican Church members would host a joint service with members of the Muslim community.

A memorial service at Whangārei Hospital's Chapel of St Lukes and a vigil at the Taha Awa Riverside Gardens in Dargaville were both held yesterday afternoon.