It was another boxing scorecard that stunned the world, but when the judges' verdict was read out to a raucous Staples Centre in Los Angeles, Tyson Fury was unusually calm.

The returning British hero had outboxed Deontay Wilder for most of their world title fight and despite being knocked down in the ninth and 12th rounds, was ahead in the eyes of most pundits.

But when the result was announced as a split decision draw, both men were seemingly nonplussed.

"We're on away soil, I got knocked down twice — but I still believe I won the fight," Fury said.

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"I think with the two knockdowns I definitely won the fight," said Wilder, as he retained the WBC title.

It was another boxing scorecard that stunned the world, but when the judges' verdict was read out to a raucous Staples Centre in Los Angeles, Tyson Fury was unusually calm. Photo / Getty
It was another boxing scorecard that stunned the world, but when the judges' verdict was read out to a raucous Staples Centre in Los Angeles, Tyson Fury was unusually calm. Photo / Getty

But Fury has now revealed why he held his tongue — and it wasn't because he was content with the outcome.

"You know what it was?" Fury said. "I was telling my brothers and my family to keep quiet. Because there were about 10,000 travellers, Brits, that came from around the world (to attend the fight). They probably would have smashed this arena up if I'd instigated it. I mean to the floor. I just wanted to be an ambassador for my country and my people."

On closer inspection, the scorecard was shown to be a farce as the officials failed to even add up one score correctly, news.com.au reported.

Canada's Robert Tapper's score was announced as 114-110 in Fury's favour, even though his scores added up to 114-112.

Even then, his score was probably the most accurate reflection of the fight. It was hard to be overly critical of Englishman Phil Edwards' verdict of a 113-113 draw either, but Mexico's Alejandro Rochin's ruling of a 115-111 win to Wilder was a shocker in most people's eyes.

Tyson Fury taunts Deontay Wilder. Photo / Harry How / Getty Images
Tyson Fury taunts Deontay Wilder. Photo / Harry How / Getty Images

The morning after the fight, with the threat of destruction removed, Fury was able to speak more freely about his disappointment.

"I don't know what fight they were watching," he said. "It was the (worst) decision since the first Lennox Lewis-Evander Holyfield fight. It's stuff like this that gives boxing a bad name. All the reports will be about how bad the decision was.

"I thought I won the fight comfortably, even though I had to climb off the floor twice. If I didn't get knocked down twice, I would still have lost on one judge's card. He should be banned from boxing. Or at least go to Specsavers.

"I'm not going to let the decision ruin what was a good fight.

"Wilder has had a gift decision in his own country, fair play to him. He still has the green belt but the world knows it belongs to Tyson Fury. But I don't want to take anything away from Wilder, the decision was not his fault and he's a fantastic fighter."

Fury has been hailed a hero for beating the count after being sent crashing to the canvas with a devastating left hook in the 12th and final round. But he credited referee Jack Reiss allowing him the chance to fight on.

"You can't go swimming and not get wet. And I got wet. I got drenched actually," Fury said.

"Fair play to Jack Reiss, he's fantastic referee, the best I've ever experienced. He did say in the changing room before the fight, 'If anyone goes down I will give you chance to prove you're okay. But you must prove you're okay, otherwise I will stop the fight'.

"I done myself proud. It could easily have been a riot there last night, but I calmed the situation down by not complaining about the decision."