Champion New Zealand boxer Joseph Parker says that safety must come first in boxing and he understands the decision of some gyms to no longer hold corporate fights.

The West Auckland based, Peach Boxing gym has announced it will no longer run corporate events after one of its fighters was knocked out just seconds into his first ever fight.

Joel Rea was seriously concussed on August 25, in his heavyweight bout at Auckland's ABA Stadium in a corporate event run by Peach Boxing gym.

The 36-year-old was hospitalised for several days at Auckland City Hospital undergoing a number CT scans to check for bleeding on the brain.

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Rea has not returned to work since the fight a week ago, and is set to see a therapist next week to asses the severity of his concussion and the extent of brain injury.

Since then another gym, Boxing Central, has announced it too would no longer hold corporate events with its owner saying the rules are not being followed.

Joseph Parker talks about the importance of safety in boxing following a serious injury to one fighter in a corporate bout. Photo / Stuart Munro.
Joseph Parker talks about the importance of safety in boxing following a serious injury to one fighter in a corporate bout. Photo / Stuart Munro.

After landing in Whanganui for a four day trip, Parker said that like any sport, boxing had it's dangers.

"It's their decision," he said, of the clubs stopping corporate events.

"I mean every sport you can get injured.

"It's a sport that if you get really injured, like for example the fight that we saw that the guy got really injured, so it's one of those things that safety's first ... if you feel like you're not up for the challenge or up for getting punched."

Olivia Rea with her husband, Joel Rea, who has not returned to work since the fight a week ago, and is set to see a therapist next week to asses the severity of his concussion.
Olivia Rea with her husband, Joel Rea, who has not returned to work since the fight a week ago, and is set to see a therapist next week to asses the severity of his concussion.

Parker was due to visit the Awa Kings boxing gym while in Whanganui and he said he'd offer advice on safety.

"If you want to do it - give it a go," he said.

"Make sure you're doing it the right way. Getting the right training and doing the right things in order to prepare well. But safety's first. If they're choosing to do that then good.

"Listen, I'll teach them what I can and I'll give the advice that I can give them. I look forward to showing them what I know."