It's been three decades since Naomi Wolf's book The Beauty Myth was published. Joanna Mathers examines its currency and legacy.

White teeth, glowing skin, luscious hair, golden legs. These are the missiles launched from magazine covers and billboards by glossy-tressed angels with beatific smiles.

Everyday women, barraged by such ridiculous beauty, spend hard-won, independently earned money on potions that promises to make them sleeker, glossier, more desirable. Having been freed from the kitchen, the battlefield is now women's bodies, starved and cut with scalpels and covered in expensive gunk.

Western women transcended the tyranny of biology with the invention of

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