By Rachel Grunwell

If I practise healthy habits, then at least I model this to my kids, hoping they give things a go too.

Rachel Grunwell, who competed in the Rotorua Marathon, was proud to see son Lachie, 11, and nephew Kaspa Grunwell, 12, follow in her footsteps.

Inspire your kids by "doing" rather than "telling" is something I preach often. It turns out my approach is commended by the author of a new book which is leading a revolution on showing us how to be our best, so our children can be their best too.

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Firstly, I'm not a perfect parent (by a long shot). But one of my biggest wishes is similar to most parents: To have healthy and happy kids who try their best and have grit. So, this means they need things like healthy kai, enough sleep and hydration, support and encouragement, and plenty of movement.

So, I try to walk the talk as much as possible. If I practise healthy habits, then at least I model this to my kids, hoping they give things a go too.

I run, do CrossFit, and yoga. I don't give a toss what sports my kids do movement-wise. I just care that they're moving in some way because this underpins how well they think and feel — and is good socially too.

It's darn important. My oldest son is a mountain biker, middle son Lachie plays squash, while the youngest chap does swim lessons and scooters or walks to school regularly.

I was super proud last week when my son Lachie, 11, and nephew Kaspa Grunwell, 12, ran the 10km distance at the Rotorua Marathon event on May 4. Their achievement made me more heart-happy than my medal for conquering the full marathon.

Kaspa Grunwell, 12 and Lachie Bluckley, 11. Photo / Supplied
Kaspa Grunwell, 12 and Lachie Bluckley, 11. Photo / Supplied

I was stoked they put their hands up to run that distance and had grit to get to the end of this gruelling distance.

There were also over 2700 kids from 34 schools who took part in the Rotorua Mini Marathon which is part of this event too. How cool is that? I'd like to give the parents of these kids a high-five too.

Doing an event like this teaches kids perseverance and learning to fail with grace. These are great life skills.

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Esther Wojcicki — lauded by the likes of Steve Jobs — is about to release a book called How to Raise Successful People — simple lessons for radical results. It's in bookstores on May 21. I recommend it.

Esther writes: "What you feel and model, is what you get" (with your kids). She also says things like "kids pick up on your subconscious cues". Decoded: What you do can inspire your kids on their life journey.

She and I, by the way, are both anti-helicopter-parenting. We want kids to learn how to do things for themselves.

Esther's approach is also all about deep nurturing to encourage independence, responsibility, self-motivation and success. For the record, her daughters are all successful. Susan is the CEO of YouTube, Anne is the co-founder and CEO of 23andMe, Janet is a leading medical researcher and Fullbright scholar at UCSF. Esther also has a great relationship with her gals.

Four tips to inspire kids to have grit & be successful

• Quit helicopter parenting.
• Be a Panda Mum, not a Tiger Mum.
• What you feel and model, is what you get.
• Learn to fail with grace.

• Rachel Grunwell is a wellness expert and author of Balance: Food, Health + Happiness. She leads Mindful Moments retreats at Polynesian Spa.
Follow Rachel's website, inspiredhealth.co.nz, Instagram, rachelgrunwell, or InspiredHealthNZ's Facebook, InspiredHealthNZ