A man from the US has taken out a giant advertisement in The Times stating that he is the rightful king of England and will claim his historic royal estate, all lands, assets and titles within 30 days.

In the feature length soliloquy Allan V. Evans from Wheat Ridge, Colorado, says he is a descendant of a royal Welsh line from the 3rd century.

Mr Evans also asserts in Tuesday's paper that he is the descendant of Cunedda Wledig, the founder of the Kingdom of Wales.

He writes: "Allan V. Evans... is a direct descendant of an unbroken line of primogeniture line legally documented since the 3rd Century

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"[Cunedda] married the Princess of Powys, whose direct descendant was the Cilman Droed Ddu, being the founder of the 4th Royal Tribe of Wales who was the King of Wales and the King of the Isle of Man.

"Hereby gives legal notice, to all his relatives, Welshman, Scots, Manx, all Britons and any and all interested parties and persons, that in (30) thirty days' time, that the said Allan V. Evans shall claim his royal estate which is a conglomerate of about (17) historic estates..."

Despite stating he will assume the "Royal Title and Crown of Wales" within a month he assured the British public that he will only demand the throne after the death of Queen Elizabeth II and not oust her from power out of "deepest respect" for her.

Evans closes the advert by saying that "freedom and egalitarianism shall be promoted" and he vowed to make Great Britain "great once again."

He concludes: "Lady Britania who has contributed so much to the culture and history of the world shall be renewed and made great once again; for the legend was not a myth but was indeed true, and more than a mere Tolkien story, that the men of the West are now returning and now is the time of the return of the King."

Evans also attempted to claim 400 was acres of land in Twiggs county, Georgia in 2012 which promptly rejected by lawyers, according to 13WMAZ.

He said that 35 homeowners lived on the estate where his ancestors once lived, but had no evidence to support his claim of ownership.

In 1901 the Macon Telegraph reported that a fire burned down the county courthouse which Mr Evans said destroyed evidence that he was the rightful owner of the plot.