The Latest: Leader says tribe 'undaunted' by pipeline notice

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) " The Latest on the Dakota Access pipeline being built to carry oil from North Dakota to Illinois (all times local):

5:10 p.m.

The chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux says the tribe is "undaunted" by an Army decision to allow completion of the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

Dave Archambault (AHR'-sham-boh) said Tuesday that the tribe will challenge in court the Army's decision to halt further study on the pipeline's crossing of the Missouri River in North Dakota. Archambault says even if the pipeline is finished, the tribe will push to get it shut down.

The tribe fears a pipeline leak would contaminate drinking water for the reservation and millions downstream. The Dallas-based pipeline developer says it's safe.

Archambault says a "Native Nation's March" is planned in Washington, D.C., on March 10, and he asked the tribe's allies to take part in calling for Congress to demand "a fair and accurate process."

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4:55 p.m.

North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum is applauding the Army's decision to allow completion of the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

But Burgum says his "top priority" remains public safety and the cleanup of an area near the pipeline route where hundreds and sometimes thousands of pipeline opponents have camped since last summer.

The Standing Rock Sioux have led the protests. The tribe through a contractor is cleaning up tons of garbage before spring flooding can wash debris into area rivers. The Army Corps of Engineers has notified remaining protesters that the government-owned land will be closed Feb. 22.

Burgum says if the area isn't cleaned up, it could be "an ecological disaster."

The Army notified Congress Tuesday it will end study of the pipeline's disputed Missouri River crossing in North Dakota, and allow construction to proceed.

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4:20 p.m.

A leader of Dakota Access pipeline opponents says protests will continue, despite an Army decision clearing the way for the $3.8 billion project's completion.

Phyllis Young is a leader at the encampment near Lake Oahe (oh-AH'-hee) where hundreds and sometimes thousands of opponents have gathered since last summer. She says the Army decision to end study and allow the pipeline to cross under the Missouri River reservoir is disappointing but expected.

Young is a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which worries a pipeline leak could pollute its drinking water.

She calls the anti-pipeline effort "our life struggle," and says it will continue "however we have to do it."

The tribe has promised to fight completion of the project in court. Dallas-based pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners says the pipeline is safe.

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4 p.m.

Environmental groups are criticizing an Army decision to end study of a disputed Dakota Access pipeline river crossing and clear the way for completion of the $3.8 billion project to move North Dakota oil to Illinois.

The Army notified Congress on Tuesday that it will allow the pipeline to cross under the Missouri River in North Dakota, the last big chunk of construction. Approval could come as early as Wednesday.

The Sierra Club, Greenpeace and the Center for Biological Diversity issued statements saying President Donald Trump's administration is putting corporate profits ahead of Native Americans and the environment.

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe worries a pipeline leak could pollute its drinking water and has promised to fight completion of the project in court.

Dallas-based pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners says the pipeline is safe.

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3:45 p.m.

North Dakota's congressional delegation is welcoming the Army's announcement that it will clear the way for completion of the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

The Army said Tuesday that it will allow the pipeline to cross under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota, the final big chunk of work on the project.

Republican Rep. Kevin Cramer says the move comes after months of unnecessary delay. Republican Sen. John Hoeven says the pipeline will serve the nation's need for new energy infrastructure and is being built with "the latest safeguards."

Democratic Sen. Heidi Heitkamp says the Army's announcement brings the pipeline conflict one step closer to resolution. She says it "delivers the certainty and clarity" she's been demanding.

The pipeline has been the target of months of protests by the Standing Rock Sioux, who say it threatens drinking water.

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3:20 p.m.

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe is promising a legal battle after the Army said it's clearing the way for completion of the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

Tribal attorney Jan (yahn) Hasselman says the government "will be held accountable in court." He says the specifics of the tribe's challenge are being worked out.

The Army said Tuesday that it will allow the $3.8 billion pipeline to cross under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. That's the final big chunk of work on the pipeline that will move oil from North Dakota through the Dakotas and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois.

The Standing Rock Sioux worries a pipeline leak could pollute its drinking water. Hasselman says other routes should be considered.

Dallas-based developer Energy Transfer Partners says the pipeline is safe.

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2:51 p.m.

The Army has notified Congress that it will allow the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline to cross under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota, completing the four-state project to move North Dakota oil to Illinois.

The Justice Department filed court documents Tuesday including letters to members of Congress from Deputy Assistant Army Secretary Paul Cramer. The Army intends to allow the crossing under Lake Oahe (oh-AH'-hee) as early as Wednesday.

The crossing is the final big chunk of work on the pipeline.

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe worries a pipeline leak could pollute drinking water. It's promised to continue legal challenges.

Dallas-based pipeline developer Energy Transfer Partners says the pipeline is safe.

This story has been automatically published from the Associated Press wire which uses US spellings

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