It's common for presidential candidates to get a bump from their conventions, and two polls yesterday suggest Donald Trump did indeed get that.

The Republican presidential nominee posted a two-point lead over his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released today, the first time he has been ahead since early May.

The July 22-26 poll found that 39 per cent of likely voters supported Trump, 37 per cent supported Clinton and 24 per cent would vote for neither. The poll had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points, meaning that the two candidates should be considered about even in support.

But the new polls don't just show Trump's stock rising (however temporarily that may be); they also have some very bad news for Hillary Clinton and her already-declining personal image. Indeed, politically, she's doing as bad as she ever has - if not worse.

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A caveat at the outset: The GOP convention was, as was to be expected, very anti-Clinton. There were chants of "lock her up" and plenty of accusations lodged against Clinton. So it's perhaps not surprising to see Clinton's numbers take a hit. But they have been steadily getting worse for months and are now basically worse than ever before.

Below, four key points:

Donald Trump has seen his stock rise since the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last week and is leading is several polls. Photo / AP
Donald Trump has seen his stock rise since the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last week and is leading is several polls. Photo / AP
Hillary Clinton's public image has been in steady decline over recent months. Photo / File
Hillary Clinton's public image has been in steady decline over recent months. Photo / File

3) Just 38 per cent would be "proud" to have her as president

That's down from 55 per cent in March 2015. Sixty per cent say they would not be proud.

On this measure, she's basically on the same footing as Trump, whom 39 per cent would be proud of and 59 per cent wouldn't be.

4) Nearly half of Democratic primary voters still want Bernie Sanders

Clinton dispatched with Sanders and now has his endorsement, but despite 9 in 10 consistent Sanders supporters saying they'll vote Clinton in November, many of them still pine for their first love.

The CNN poll, in fact, shows 45 per cent of those who voted in Democratic primaries still say they wish it was Sanders. Just 49 per cent say they prefer Clinton - down from 55 per cent a month ago.