Huge bomb found in Dublin ahead of cycle race

The pack pedals during the 187-kilometre third stage of the Giro d'Italia from Armagh, to Dublin, Ireland. A huge bomb was found in Dublin just hours before cyclists passed through. Photo / AP
The pack pedals during the 187-kilometre third stage of the Giro d'Italia from Armagh, to Dublin, Ireland. A huge bomb was found in Dublin just hours before cyclists passed through. Photo / AP

Irish police have arrested a man after a huge car bomb was found in Dublin hours before the city welcomed a stage of the Giro d'Italia cycling race at the weekend.

The bomb, reportedly containing 22 kilograms of explosives made from fertiliser, was found in a Northern Ireland-registered vehicle in a hotel car park on Saturday night, police say.

On Sunday, Germany's Marcel Kittel won his second successive Giro d'Italia stage win on the final day of the race in Ireland.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility but suspicion fell on dissident republican groups opposed to the peace process in Northern Ireland.

"The viable device was located in a car in the car park of the hotel at approximately 9pm on May 10," police said in a statement on Monday.

They said the bomb was not primed.

Finnstown Country House, a luxury hotel in west Dublin that was hosting a wedding at the time, was evacuated while army bomb disposal units made the device safe.

Tens of thousands of people lined the route in Dublin on Sunday to cheer on the cyclists with millions more watching around the world.

A 55-year-old man was arrested on Sunday, police said.

It is understood he has close links to the Real IRA, a breakaway faction of the Provisional IRA that remains active despite the Northern Ireland peace process.

The bomb scare comes amid heightened tensions over the arrest in Northern Ireland earlier this month of Gerry Adams, the leader of the Republican Sinn Fein party, over a notorious IRA murder.

Around 3500 people died in three decades of violence between Protestants favouring continued union of Northern Ireland with Britain, and Catholics seeking a unified Ireland.

- AFP

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