Last week, Burma's government announced that it would no longer allow tourists to climb some of the ancient temples in the capital of Bagan.

In a statement posted on Facebook, it slammed tourists for "culturally disgraceful" acts "such as wearing inappropriate clothing, dancing and sleeping [on the monuments]".

Sagada, a small village in the northern Philippines known for its peculiar caves, ancestral traditions and mountainous landscape, has experienced similar issues. Locals have been overwhelmed by a rapid increase of tourists in recent years. Though these "untouched" locations are sought after by adventure-seeking tourists, these cases show how quickly things can change - so we've put together some tips on how to travel ethically.

RESEARCH
Before you travel abroad, learn as much about your destination as you can. Find out how the locals live and learn a few words in their language - it'll go a long way.

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CHOOSE A RESPONSIBLE TOUR GUIDE
If you're travelling with a tour, ask to see their policy around responsible tourism - focus on environmental impact and support for the local economy. It's even better if you can source a local guide to show you around.

RESPECT CULTURAL TRADITIONS
Show respect when visiting sacred cultural and religious sites. In Luang Prabang in Laos, there have been complaints about tourist getting too close to monks while taking pictures. Prince Nithakhong Tiaoksomsanith commented, "This is a religious procession, not Disneyland".

ASK BEFORE YOU TAKE PHOTOS
Monks are not the only ones who might not appreciate having a camera shoved in their faces. Just because locals are dressed differently doesn't give you the right to treat them like a sideshow. Ask for permission and it may just be granted with a friendly smile - which makes for a better photo. If a local asks you to send them a picture once you're back, make sure you do. Many tourists promise this and don't follow through.

BUY AND EAT LOCAL
Support the economy by buying and eating local products. However, it's important to avoid products made from endangered species or ancient artefacts. Bargaining is common in many countries, but it's important to pay a fair price.

DON'T WASTE RESOURCES
Tourists often forget that water is a precious resource in many countries. Have showers, rather than baths and try not to leave taps running longer than necessary.

BE A TIDY KIWI
Be mindful of how you dispose of your rubbish, just as you would at home. If there's no bins available, take your trash away with you.

RESPECT NATURE
It's important to respect wild animals in your travels. Don't feed them, keep quiet and keep your distance - this is mostly for your own safety. Refrain from picking flowers or plants as well - they're happier in their natural environment.