Urgent work is under way to remove large, exposed logs and a fence from Sandy Bay in the face of more wild weather expected for Northland.

The Whangarei District Council has heavy machinery on the beach after feedback from coastal engineers Andre and Robin Labonte, who were asked to review erosion and remedial work at Sandy Bay.

Mr Labonte had advised the council the stream that had changed course and started emptying into the middle of the beach was unlikely to naturally flow northward again.

Read more: Storm causes damage at Sandy Bay and One Tree Point
Work to repair erosion at Whangarei's Sandy Bay begins

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The council was disappointed its "soft" remedial option failed so quickly, said Sue Hodge, the council's parks manager.

"Based on this feedback and the forecast weather event which could create public safety issues, we have decided to remove all the logs, anchors and sand fence," Ms Hodge said.

"This year all logs along the stream have become exposed. While they are still chained down we do have concerns with the cyclone forecast later this week.

"The logs along the beach are still partially buried but we are concerned that they could become a serious public safety hazard."

The removal and subsequent beach repair work was expected to take two to three days.

Whangarei council will work fast to remove exposed dune repair structures at Sandy Bay before the next tail of a Pacific cyclone hits.
Whangarei council will work fast to remove exposed dune repair structures at Sandy Bay before the next tail of a Pacific cyclone hits.

Sandy Bay resident Dave Gould was among several locals watching the removal work begin yesterday morning.

Some of the augers and chains holding the logs in place had further loosened the night before and one large log had been swept up the stream, he said.

The stream had changed course on to the beach some time ago and was undermining the bank near public toilets and a grassed area.

The logs put in to hold the stream banks to a northward course had been catching and holding sand until the two recent storm fronts accompanied by king tide "shook things around", Mr Gould said.

"They protected the bank as they were supposed to do.

"I was impressed when the council put that work in place. Like the council, everyone hoped it would work and we're disappointed it didn't.

"It just seems the whole lot is not sturdy enough to withstand the big tides."

Mr Labonte said the best long-term option was most likely a hard structure along the stream edge to protect the public toilets and surf club building sitting on the bank.