Five patients from Starship Hospital have been given the royal treatment from the All Blacks.

Louis Stillman, 10, who was diagnosed with cancer in his cheek bone earlier this year, was among kids to meet the players and coach Steve Hansen ahead of Saturday's test match against the Springboks.

The rugby fanatic got to meet and talk to his favourite player Beauden Barrett at the All Blacks captain's run at QBE Stadium in Albany on Friday.

Louis Stillman wears an autographed All Black rugby jersey at All Black training today. Photo / supplied
Louis Stillman wears an autographed All Black rugby jersey at All Black training today. Photo / supplied

"I just said 'good luck and that he's my favourite'," said Louis, who also had his jersey signed by the players.

The 10 year old, who was a prop for East Coast Bays, has been told he can't play rugby at the moment as he is due to have a unique surgery next week, which would involve replacing his cheek bone with one of his ribs.

Advertisement
Steve Hansen tries a jersey on Isabel Gilbert. Photo / supplied
Steve Hansen tries a jersey on Isabel Gilbert. Photo / supplied

Louis' mum Kelly Boland said her son was "gutted" when he found out he couldn't play rugby but that the risk was just too high.

"[Playing rugby] was one of his passions. He was just really saddened that he couldn't play and he kind of felt like he was letting his team down but of course, they understood."

She said it was an awesome experience watching the All Blacks train and seeing her son meet the players.

"It's a lovely distraction to what he's going through."

Isabel Gilbert, 8, was also lucky enough to meet the players, score herself an All Blacks rugby jersey and a behind-the-scenes tour of QBE stadium.

Louis Stillman shakes Steve Hansen's hand after being presented with an autographed All Black rugby jersey. Photo / supplied
Louis Stillman shakes Steve Hansen's hand after being presented with an autographed All Black rugby jersey. Photo / supplied

She said it was "really good" meeting the players including Israel Dagg and Kieran Read.

Isabel enjoys watching rugby and has taken on the role of photographer for her younger brother's under six rugby team.

The eight year old suffers from a rare genetic condition called chondrodysplasia punctate - a form of dwarfism.

Two weeks ago, Isabel underwent leg lengthening surgery. It was likely to be the first of at least a couple, during her childhood, to help redress the 11cm difference between the lengths of her legs.

Starship Foundation chief executive Brad Clark said Starship was thankful to All Blacks sponsor ASB for providing this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for five rugby-mad, Starship patients.

ASB head of community, sponsorship and event Mark Graham was delighted to provide this opportunity to young rugby fans.

"We're thrilled to work with New Zealand Rugby to offer Starship patients this exciting opportunity," said Graham.

"We hope the experience brightens their day and is something they'll remember fondly for a long time."