What do you think of the election results?

Name:

Heather Keefe

Age:

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40s

Occupation:

Accountant

There has probably never been a more uncertain election. Polls all over the place. Todd's return is refreshing continuing the focus and commitment to Rotorua and nationally.

Maori are the big losers. It is likely Peters will form the next government with National. Maori will no longer be at the table as an independent voice. Te Ururoa's commitment and tireless efforts of the party have borne more fruit for Maori than Labour achieved in its terms of office in recent decades. Maori have no independent voice at the table for another three years. A sad day!

A National return with NZ First will maintain stability and growth. Commitment to social issues over the next three years is a must.

Name:

Russell Hallam

Age:

72

Occupation:

Retired school principal

While the outcome, so far, of the election is not totally unexpected, I am a little surprised the gap between the two major parties is not as close as I thought it would be.

The negotiations with minor parties over the next little while will be interesting, as they will ultimately decide our next Government.

Locally, we still have three Members of Parliament based in Rotorua, I congratulate each of them on their success, and look forward to our district continuing to have strong representation in Parliament.

I think the Members of Parliament across all parties who are Maori, now have a responsibility to ensure the issues of particular interest to Maori continue to be addressed.

Name:

Brett Wilson

Age:

52

Occupation:

Watchdog Security chief executive officer

Not a bad result for National considering, but less than desirable overall. Winston has a long history of creating unstable government so whoever he chooses to go with is going to have their work cut out. Winston puts the "loose" in cannon.

I feel sorry for Te Ururoa Flavell. He achieved more wins for Maori in the past six years than Labour has in its entire history so I am stunned the electorate turned on him as they did. It shows many voters buy into the cult of personality instead of delving into the facts and policies.

Name:

Fraser Newman

Age:

31

Occupation:

Bookshop owner

I voted for National and Todd McClay. I have nothing against the other candidates. But I'm glad it's over. Elections are so divisive and bring out the best and worst in us. It creates an us vs them mentality which I don't believe is healthy. We see the nuances, depth and differences on our own side, but fool ourselves into thinking the other side is all the same. More often than not we project our own fears onto them, without listening to what they actually have to say. I'm broadly happy with the results thus far. Don't like NZ First being in kingmaker position, but life's unfair at times.

Name:

Theresa McLean

Age:

18

Occupation:

Student

I think there are some real benefits that come with a National government. I have faith in [English] steering us through housing and economic issues. I hope they do more for healthy housing. I am really gutted about the Maori Party not making it into Parliament. I thought it was really important they had representation in government. I really admire Te Ururoa Flavell, and the work he's done for our community. I am sad because it looks like New Zealand has maybe lost the opportunity to do more for climate change, and I like swimming in clean rivers. I'm also not a huge fan of more roading, and hope New Zealand has more sustainable future transport options. However, who knows what will happen at this stage!

Name:

Ngaa Ruuira Puumanawawhiti

Age:

23

Occupation:

Cultural market manager, New Zealand Maori Arts and Crafts Institute

It seems that Maori voters throughout the country have rejected the notion of an independent Maori voice in Parliament and Maori politics has come full circle again to a pre-2004 political landscape whereby the only points of advocacy are through those who are tied to their party lines. If Labour Party cannot form a credible government, it will result in all Maori seats now sitting in opposition with no Maori seats at the table. Even still, the Maori people continue to demonstrate their loyalty and commitment to Labour and the shark in this instance, was unable to escape the throat of the political whirlpool.