How often do we complain about really trivial things as if they were the end of the world?

"It's too cold today", "I'm too tired to go to the gym", "this coffee is too hot", "I have a lot to do today".

I know I'm guilty of all of the above, and more.

I have the opportunity to meet and write about some truly inspirational athletes who put my very minor issues into perspective.

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Last week it was Lisa Adams, who loves sport, but has cerebral palsy on one side of her body. Rather than deciding that being involved and active would be too hard, she has embraced her disability and learnt to adapt. She has not only played, but performed well at basketball, netball and now rugby.

I also wrote about Rotorua man Bryan Eckersley, a 72-year-old who, since having a heart transplant in 2005, has competed and won medals at three World Transplant Games, five Australian Transplant Games and five New Zealand Masters Games.

In the past I have written about para-athletes who have spent their lives breaking down barriers, proving they can do anything their able-bodied counterparts can do and rising to the top in their respective sports.

If you ever have the opportunity to watch, or even volunteer at, the Halberg Junior Disability Games or a similar event I 100 per cent encourage you to do so.

These are young people with a range of disabilities and impairments throwing caution to the wind and saying, "Hey, I'll give anything a go."

Yet many of us complain about trivial issues like being stuck in traffic or the wireless internet going too slow.

In the world of professional sport there are countless athletes who have come from nothing, but risen to fame in their chosen sport.

Two of the most successful sportspeople in the world, Cristiano Ronaldo and LeBron James, famously came from extremely poor families who struggled to support them. But, their love for, and determination to do well in, their chosen sports saw them rise to the top.

Whether you are sports mad or you couldn't care less, there are inspirational athletes locally and globally with attitudes we could all learn a lot from.

So next time you find yourself complaining about something, step back and think about how big of an issue it really is. You might be surprised.