Rebecca Malcolm

Rotorua Daily Post health and business reporter

Family fun day for Tianajay

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BRAVE GIRL: Tianajay Klomp-Loffley is in Starship Hospital fighting leukaemia. Photo / SUPPLIED
BRAVE GIRL: Tianajay Klomp-Loffley is in Starship Hospital fighting leukaemia. Photo / SUPPLIED

After seeing her niece battling cancer, Miriarangi Loffley would shave her head and stay bald forever if it meant the youngster would be better.

Unfortunately, the Rotorua woman knows that's not the case - but she's hoping by shaving her head and raising money for 4-year-old Tianajay Klomp-Loffley she'll at least be able to help make life a bit easier for her niece and her mother, Tia.

Tianajay has been in Starship Hospital since she was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia in April.

As well as shaving off her hair, Ms Loffley has organised a family fun day today, which she hopes will raise up to $10,000.

Money will go to Shave for a Cure, Blood and Leukaemia Foundation and also the family.

Ms Loffley said the day would involve spot prizes, fun family activities, children's entertainment, food and cake stalls and auctions and raffles.

The day will run from 10am to 3pm at Selwyn Primary School

Seven people will be shaving their heads on the day - six family members and a daycare teacher.

Ms Loffley said seeing what her sister and niece had been through had prompted her to organise the fundraiser. "It's been a pretty difficult time for my sister."

Tianajay's mother has two other children who had to remain in Rotorua, which was difficult, Ms Loffley said.

Tianajay had only been able to come back to Rotorua once since April. Ms Loffley said the experience had been quite upsetting because her niece thought she'd be able to stay home and was upset at having to return to hospital.

They had hoped for her to be well enough to attend today's fundraiser but that wasn't the case.

Ms Loffley said every day was different with her niece and she could go from being chirpy and happy to vomiting and sporting a rash from the drugs very quickly.

"Needle pricks are one of the traumatic things she can't stand."

Ms Loffley said the family were all trying to stay positive.

By raising money, she said she hoped she could make life easier for her sister and niece once they were able to return home to Rotorua.

- Rotorua Daily Post

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