Sex tips from an outrageously chauvinistic 1945 guide

By Margot Peppers

Thomas Horton's 1945 relationship guide, What Men Don't Like About Women, which was aimed at women, explains how she should always be subordinate to her man. Photo / Creative Commons
Thomas Horton's 1945 relationship guide, What Men Don't Like About Women, which was aimed at women, explains how she should always be subordinate to her man. Photo / Creative Commons

A vintage relationship guide aimed at women reveals the outrageous sexism practiced by men during the Forties.

Thomas Horton's 1945 book What Men Don't Like About Women, which was recently unearthed by TheDebrief, lists a woman's "discourteous behavior", "ineptness" and "vulgar talk" in the bedroom as some of her most deplorable qualities.

The book also explains how a woman should always be subordinate to her man, which includes never taking the lead when it comes to sex.

"There are few things in this world that offend a man more than to be directed in the sex act by his woman," it reads. "Nature demands that the male be dominant in bed if nowhere else."

The writer adds in a rather dire way that while women may believe that telling a man what to do in bed is "natural", it can in fact ruin a relationship.

"The truth is that it is degrading, that it sets up a terrific inferiority complex in the man, and that the upshot is marital misery - or divorce," it reads.

Horton goes on to address the habit women apparently have of asking for things during or after sex.

"Could there be any worse time for a woman to ask for a winter coat or a trip to Florida or a new refrigerator or a town car or a spring outfit than in bed with her man?" he writes.

"Yet she does it so often that one might almost look upon it as a congenial trait of the sex."

Other issues discussed include women's "ineptness" when it comes to pillow talk.

"[Women] assume that since they are in a state of nature with a man, they are his intellectual equal," reads the book.

"So they blab and blab, taxing the man's patience no end. What he really wants are quiet rest and sleep."

Not only does the guide talk about where women go wrong in the bedroom, but it also discusses their faults in the workplace and as a "walking companion".

Indeed, one section reads: "It is absolutely impossible to have a pleasant time walking with a woman.

"She will stop at store windows... she will orate on the value of women getting together to reduce the price of fur coats for working girls, and so on."

The chapter concludes pessimistically: "The result of such a walk, of course, is that the man returns home in lower spirits than before - and determined never to see that chatter-box again."

- DailyMail

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