One of the first officers to arrive at a West Auckland quarry where a woman was viciously assaulted after being kidnapped in the city has described the harrowing moment he found the bloodied and battered woman.

Colin Jack Mitchell is on trial in the High Court at Auckland this week on charges of abduction, wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm and assault with intent to commit sexual violation.

It is alleged he kidnapped a 23-year-old woman from Grey Lynn in the early hours of February 26 last year, drove her 25km to a stone quarry in Riverhead and assaulted her.

The Crown say Mitchell intended to rape the woman and she was lucky to get away from him.

Advertisement

The victim has little memory of her ordeal, but earlier told the court that she frantically called 111 for help after she woke at the quarry to find a masked man standing over her, brandishing a weapon.

She had no idea where she was, and it took police an hour to locate her.

Constable Kelvin Meek was one of the first officers on the scene.

He said when he and his colleague arrived at the quarry it was dark and they had no idea where the victim was.

The victim earlier told the court that she frantically called 111 for help after she woke at the quarry to find a masked man standing over her, brandishing a weapon. Photo / File
The victim earlier told the court that she frantically called 111 for help after she woke at the quarry to find a masked man standing over her, brandishing a weapon. Photo / File

They turned on the flashing lights on the patrol car, hoping it would draw her out.

"We drove in looking for anything we could, I got out of car, and I saw the victim run towards me," Meek told the court this afternoon.

"It was very eye opening for me, I described it as being like someone had taken a bucket of blood and tipped it all over her… it was daunting.

"She was upset, lost, but I could see some resilience in her as a person.

"I realised the quantity of what was happening and that evidence needed to be collected."

Meek said he tried to contain the woman and ensure evidence was preserved while trying to show empathy at the same time.

"She really wanted to be quite close to us, the feeling I got she felt a lot of security in us being there," he said.

The victim earlier spoke about seeing police and desperately wanting a hug - but they could not touch her in case it contaminated any DNA evidence.

Meek stayed with the victim as she was put into an ambulance and taken to hospital.

The judge released scene pictures from the attack showing the woman's cellphone, shoes and blood. Photo / supplied
The judge released scene pictures from the attack showing the woman's cellphone, shoes and blood. Photo / supplied

"I remember her being very on edge and giving me a lot of information, I just wanted to do the best I could," he recalled.

Crown prosecutor Kirsten Lummis asked Meek what items he seized as evidence when the victim was first found.

He collected various items the victim had been in contact with including her handbag and cellphone.

He said he used gloves when handling the items and put each into police-issued forensic bags.

The judge released scene pictures from the attack showing the woman's cellphone, shoes and blood. Photo / supplied
The judge released scene pictures from the attack showing the woman's cellphone, shoes and blood. Photo / supplied

At the hospital police spoke with staff to ensure potential evidence was collected and the situation was handled professionally.

Meek's shift finished soon after - but he didn't go home.

His colleagues were still looking for the scene of the crime, which was not where police found the victim.

Meek went back to the quarry area.

He said after speaking at length with the victim in the back of the ambulance, he believed he could find the spot where she was attacked.

"I had a strong feeling that I could act on the information, I was there with her and she was describing things to me about where it all happened," he explained.

He parked his car outside the quarry to avoid disturbing the gravel in the quarry - which may have held crucial evidence.

Meek saw fresh tracks in the dirt track and established someone had driven through the area "very recently".

He walked into an area of the quarry and found the victim's shoes.

"I could see claw marks through the dirt and blood," he said.

Meek kept walking, and saw a cellphone on the ground and a white dust mask on a digger parked nearby.

He said because the area was isolated and due to the type of rocks, indents of where anyone had moved were very clear.

He called a senior officer to alert him that he believed he had found the scene, then stayed in place guarding the area until backup arrived.

A forensic examination of the quarry followed.

Detective Constable Simon Robertson was assigned as officer in charge of the scene.

His job was to arrange police photography, forensic staff to search the area, scene guards and other staff.

During the scene examination a pair of gloves were found near a patch of visible blood.

Robertson viewed CCTV footage at the quarry, and discovered images of a car entering about 20 minutes before the victim called 111.

It left in at a much faster speed at about the same time as she made the call to police.

Robertson told the court he wore protective gloves at all times when collecting and handling items of evidence including the shoes and phone.

The trial continues.