Maori are more likely to be subjected to compulsory mental health treatment and placed in seclusion, a report has revealed.

The over-representation of Maori in mental health services was first discussed in the annual Director of Mental Health's Annual Report in 2013.

The latest report released today shows Maori continue to be put in isolation at much higher rates than non-Maori, despite dedicated efforts to eliminate isolation - overall rates have dropped by a quarter since 2009.

In 2016, Maori were 4.8 times more likely to be secluded in an adult inpatient facility than non-Maori, up from 3.7 times in 2013.

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The report also shows that Maori are 3.6 times more likely to be put under a compulsory treatment order than non-Maori.

A hui in June 2015 aimed to find out more about the experiences of tangata whaiora (Maori in mental health care) and how they could be improved.

Patients said they often did not understand the treatment process or that they struggled to be released from the Mental Health Act.

Patients said they wanted a holistic approach to mental health services that increased whanau involvement and the formation of a national body of Maori who hadexperienced mental health care to improve advocacy for tangata whaiora.

The Waitangi Tribunal will begin hearings next year over high rates of Maori suicide being a result of colonisation, including a claim put forward by Jane Stevens, the mother of Nicky Stevens who took his life in March 2015.

Where to get help

If you are worried about your or someone else's mental health, the best place to get help is your GP or local mental health provider. However, if you or someone else is in danger or endangering others, call police immediately on 111.

OR IF YOU NEED TO TALK TO SOMEONE ELSE:

LIFELINE: 0800 543 354 (available 24/7)
• SUICIDE CRISIS HELPLINE: 0508 828 865 (0508 TAUTOKO) (available 24/7)
YOUTHLINE: 0800 376 633
• NEED TO TALK? Free call or text 1737 (available 24/7)
KIDSLINE: 0800 543 754 (available 24/7)
WHATSUP: 0800 942 8787 (1pm to 11pm)
• DEPRESSION HELPLINE: 0800 111 757

- NZN